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Abdominal Pain (Causes, Remedies, Treatment) (cont.)

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Exams and tests to diagnose abdominal pain

While the history and physical examination are vitally important in determining the cause of abdominal pain, testing often is necessary to determine the cause.

Laboratory tests. Laboratory tests such as the complete blood count (CBC), liver enzymes, pancreatic enzymes (amylase and lipase), pregnancy test and urinalysis are frequently performed in the evaluation of abdominal pain.

  • An elevated white count suggests inflammation or infection (as with appendicitis, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, or colitis).
  • A low red blood cell count may indicate a bleed in the intestines.
  • Amylase and lipase (enzymes produced by the pancreas) commonly are elevated in pancreatitis.
  • Liver enzymes may be elevated with gallstone attacks or acute hepatitis.
  • Blood in the urine suggests kidney stones.
  • When there is diarrhea, white blood cells in the stool suggest intestinal inflammation or infection.
  • A positive pregnancy test may indicate an ectopic pregnancy (a pregnancy in the fallopian tube instead of the uterus).

Plain X-rays of the abdomen. Plain X-rays of the abdomen also are referred to as a KUB (because they include the kidney, ureter, and bladder). The KUB may show enlarged loops of intestines filled with copious amounts of fluid and air when there is intestinal obstruction. Patients with a perforated ulcer may have air escape from the stomach into the abdominal cavity. The escaped air often can be seen on a KUB on the underside of the diaphragm. Sometimes a KUB may reveal a calcified kidney stone that has passed into the ureter and resulted in referred abdominal pain or calcifications in the pancreas that suggests chronic pancreatitis.

Radiographic studies.

  • Abdominal ultrasoundis useful in diagnosing gallstones, cholecystitis appendicitis, or ruptured ovarian cysts as the cause of the pain.
  • Computerized tomography (CT) of the abdomen is useful in diagnosing pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer, appendicitis, and diverticulitis, as well as in diagnosing abscesses in the abdomen. Special CT scans of the abdominal blood vessels can detect diseases of the arteries that block the flow of blood to the abdominal organs.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful in diagnosing many of the same conditions as CT tomography.
  • Barium X-rays of the stomach and the intestines (upper gastrointestinal series or UGI with a small bowel follow-through) can be helpful in diagnosing ulcers, inflammation, and blockage in the intestines.
  • Computerized tomography (CT) of the small intestine can be helpful in diagnosing diseases in the small bowel such as Crohn's disease.
  • Capsule enteroscopy, a small camera the size of a pill swallowed by the patient, can take pictures of the entire small bowel and transmit the pictures onto a portable receiver. The small bowel images can be downloaded from the receiver onto a computer to be inspected by a doctor later. Capsule enteroscopy can be helpful in diagnosing Crohn's disease, small bowel tumors, and bleeding lesions not seen on x-rays or CT scans.

Endoscopic procedures.

  • Esophagogastroduodenoscopy or EGD is useful for detecting ulcers, gastritis (inflammation of the stomach), or stomach cancer.
  • Colonoscopy or flexible sigmoidoscopy is useful for diagnosing infectious colitis, ulcerative colitis, or colon cancer.
  • Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is useful for diagnosing pancreatic cancer or gallstones if the standard ultrasound or CT or MRI scans fail to detect them.
  • Balloon enteroscopy, the newest technique allows endoscopes to be passed through the mouth or anus and into the small intestine where small intestinal causes of abdominal pain or bleeding can be diagnosed, biopsied, and treated.

Surgery. Sometimes, diagnosis requires examination of the abdominal cavity either by laparoscopy or surgery.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/30/2013

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Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/abdominal_pain_causes_remedies_treatment/article.htm

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