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AccuNeb

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AccuNeb

Side Effects
Interactions

SIDE EFFECTS

Clinical Trial Experience: Adverse events reported in > 1% of patients receiving AccuNeb (albuterol sulfate inhalation solution) and more frequently than in patients receiving placebo in a four-week double-blind study are listed in the following table.

Table 1: Adverse Events with an Incidence of > 1% of Patients Receiving AccuNeb (albuterol sulfate inhalation solution) and Greater than Placebo (expressed as % of treatment group)

  1.25 mg AccuNeb
(N=115)
0.63 mg AccuNeb
(N=117)
Placebo
(N=117)
Asthma Exacerbation 13 11.1 8.5
Otitis Media 4.3 0.9 0
Allergic Reaction 0.9 3.4 1.7
Gastroenteritis 0.9 3.4 0.9
Cold Symptoms 0 3.4 1.7
Flu Syndrome 2.6 2.6 1.7
Lymphadenopathy 2.6 0.9 1.7
Skin/Appendage Infection 1.7 0 0
Urticaria 1.7 0.9 0
Migraine 0.9 1.7 0
Chest Pain 0.9 1.7 0
Bronchitis 0.9 1.7 0.9
Nausea 1.7 0.9 0.9

There was one case of ST segment depression in the 1.25 mg AccuNeb (albuterol sulfate inhalation solution) treatment group.

No clinically relevant laboratory abnormalities related to AccuNeb (albuterol sulfate inhalation solution) administration were seen in this study.

Postmarketing Experience

Metabolic acidosis has been reported after the use of albuterol sulfate inhalation solution. Because this reaction is reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate its frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure..

Read the AccuNeb (albuterol sulfate inhalation solution) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Other short-acting sympathomimetic aerosol bronchodilators or epinephrine should not be used concomitantly with AccuNeb (albuterol sulfate inhalation solution) .

AccuNeb (albuterol sulfate inhalation solution) should be administered with extreme caution to patients being treated with monoamine oxidase inhibitors or tricyclic antidepressants or within 2 weeks of discontinuation of such agents, since the action of albuterol on the vascular system may be potentiated.

Beta-receptor blocking agents not only block the pulmonary effect of beta-agonists, such as AccuNeb (albuterol sulfate inhalation solution) , but may produce severe bronchospasm in asthmatic patients. Therefore, patients with asthma should not normally be treated with beta-blockers. However, under certain circumstances (e.g., prophylaxis after myocardial infarction), there may be no acceptable alternatives to the use of beta-adrenergic blocking agents in patients with asthma. In this setting, cardioselective beta-blockers should be considered, although they should be administered with caution.

The ECG changes and/or hypokalemia that may result from the administration of non-potassium sparing diuretics (such as loop or thiazide diuretics) can be acutely worsened by beta-agonists, especially when the dose of the beta-agonist is exceeded. Although the clinical significance of these effects is unknown, caution is advised in the coadministration of beta-agonists with non-potassium sparing diuretics.

Mean decreases of 16% to 22% in serum digoxin levels were demonstrated after single dose intravenous and oral administration of albuterol, respectively, to normal volunteers who had received digoxin for 10 days. The clinical significance of these findings for patients with obstructive airway disease who are receiving albuterol and digoxin on a chronic basis is unclear. Nevertheless, it would be prudent to carefully evaluate the serum digoxin levels in patients who are currently receiving digoxin and albuterol.

Last reviewed on RxList: 4/21/2011
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Side Effects
Interactions
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