July 31, 2015
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ADHD in Children (cont.)

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What are complications and the prognosis of ADHD in children?

Current estimates are that 85% of children receiving the diagnosis of ADHD are at risk for having the disorder in some form as an adult. About one-third of those children may seem to grow out of it; however, that does not occur for all symptoms. The remaining two-thirds of children with ADHD continue to have most symptoms, but those symptoms may look differently in adulthood than in childhood. An example of that is the toddler, preschooler, or older child who has more trouble sitting compared to other children of the same age and gender still may grow up into an adult who gets bored easily. While there have been some well-founded concerns raised about the significant increase in how often ADHD is diagnosed, particularly in boys, treatment for children who truly qualify for the diagnosis is important in preventing the complications of this disorder in adulthood. Adults with ADHD may also experience significant co-occurring psychiatric and life problems, such as borderline and impulse personality problems, legal problems, substance abuse, and a significant risk for depression and anxiety disorders. Fortunately, children who receive treatment for this condition tend to be less likely to develop many of the complications associated with ADHD.

Is it possible to prevent ADHD in children?

Studies indicate that breastfeeding up to 6 months of age may help protect individuals from developing ADHD. As environmental and social insults like maternal drug use, medical, and emotional issues are risk factors for developing ADHD, prevention or treatment of those issues can help prevent or decrease the severity of this condition.

What is the latest research on ADHD in children?

Much of the latest research on ADHD in children focuses on how exposure to environmental toxins may increase the risk of developing this condition. For example, studies indicate that exposure to fluoride and other chemicals can increase the likelihood that a child develops ADHD. Also, research indicates that mothers who use acetaminophen (Tylenol) during pregnancy may be at higher risk of having a child with ADHD, particularly with more frequent use and during more than one trimester of the pregnancy.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/22/2015

Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/adhd_in_children/article.htm

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