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Allergy Medications (cont.)

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What is the best allergy medication?

The best choice of allergy medication is one which relieves symptoms without interfering with everyday tasks. Many allergy sufferers are finding that the newer, non-sedating antihistamines meet both these important parameters. It's also important to find an allergy medication that can safely be used for the long term, since for many, allergies last an entire season – if not the entire year. And finally, allergy medications should minimally react with other medications.

What can you do if your allergy medication is not working?

Allergy shots, also known as immunotherapy, may eliminate or lessen allergy symptoms if medications are ineffective or intolerable. Immunotherapy works by reducing sensitivity to allergens. Each shot contains a small, but increasing, amount of allergen. This challenges the body to build up tolerance over time. The drawbacks to immunotherapy include use of shots, cost and the fact it may take many months to complete.

Allergy medication for toddlers

Allergy medications are not recommended for use in children under the age of two years without out the advice of a physician. In this group, mild symptoms can be managed using non-drug methods such as saline spray for a stuffy or dry nose and/or a vaporizer/humidifier for congestion. If the allergy is in the form of a rash, emollient creams may offer some relief. For more severe allergy symptoms – widespread rash, wheezing, red, watery eyes – parents should consult a pediatrician.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/28/2014


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