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Altace Capsules

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Altace Capsules

ALTACE
(ramipril) Capsules

USE IN PREGNANCY

When used in pregnancy during the second and third trimesters, ACE inhibitors can cause injury and even death to the developing fetus. When pregnancy is detected, ALTACE should be discontinued as soon as possible. See WARNINGS: Fetal/neonatal morbidity and mortality.

DRUG DESCRIPTION

Ramipril is a 2-aza-bicyclo [3.3.0]-octane-3-carboxylic acid derivative. It is a white, crystalline substance soluble in polar organic solvents and buffered aqueous solutions. Ramipril melts between 105°C and 112°C.

The CAS Registry Number is 87333-19-5. Ramipril's chemical name is (2S,3aS,6aS)-1[(S)-N-[(S)-1-Carboxy-3-phenylpropyl] alanyl] octahydrocyclopenta [b]pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, 1-ethyl ester; its structural formula is:

ALTACE (ramipril) structural formula illustration

Its empiric formula is C23H32N2O5, and its molecular weight is 416.5.

Ramiprilat, the diacid metabolite of ramipril, is a non-sulfhydryl angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. Ramipril is converted to ramiprilat by hepatic cleavage of the ester group.

ALTACE (ramipril) is supplied as hard shell capsules for oral administration containing 1.25 mg, 2.5 mg, 5 mg, and 10 mg of ramipril. The inactive ingredients present are pregelatinized starch NF, gelatin, and titanium dioxide. The 1.25 mg capsule shell contains yellow iron oxide, the 2.5 mg capsule shell contains D&C yellow #10 and FD&C red #40, the 5 mg capsule shell contains FD&C blue #1 and FD&C red #40, and the 10 mg capsule shell contains FD&C blue #1.

What are the possible side effects of ramipril (Altace)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; severe stomach pain; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking ramipril and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • feeling like you might pass out;
  • high potassium level (slow heart rate, weak pulse, muscle weakness, tingly feeling;
  • dry mouth, thirst, confusion, swelling, and urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • pale skin, dark colored urine, easy bruising or bleeding;
  • jaundice...

Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Altace Capsules »

What are the precautions when taking ramipril capsules (Altace Capsules)?

Before taking ramipril, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to other ACE inhibitors (such as benazepril); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: history of an allergic reaction which included swelling of the face/lips/tongue/throat (angioedema), blood filtering procedures (such as LDL apheresis, dialysis), high level of potassium in the blood, collagen vascular disease (such as lupus, scleroderma).

This drug may make you dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do any activity that requires alertness until you are...

Read All Potential Precautions of Altace Capsules »

Last reviewed on RxList: 11/14/2013
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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Altace Capsules - User Reviews

Altace Capsules User Reviews

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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