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Ambien CR

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Ambien CR

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

Mechanism Of Action

Zolpidem, the active moiety of zolpidem tartrate, is a hypnotic agent with a chemical structure unrelated to benzodiazepines, barbiturates, or other drugs with known hypnotic properties. It interacts with a GABA-BZ receptor complex and shares some of the pharmacological properties of the benzodiazepines. In contrast to the benzodiazepines, which non-selectively bind to and activate all BZ receptor subtypes, zolpidem in vitro binds the BZ1 receptor preferentially with a high affinity ratio of the α1/α5 subunits. This selective binding of zolpidem on the BZ1 receptor is not absolute, but it may explain the relative absence of myorelaxant and anticonvulsant effects in animal studies as well as the preservation of deep sleep (stages 3 and 4) in human studies of zolpidem tartrate at hypnotic doses.

Pharmacokinetics

AMBIEN CR exhibits biphasic absorption characteristics, which results in rapid initial absorption from the gastrointestinal tract similar to zolpidem tartrate immediate-release, then provides extended plasma concentrations beyond three hours after administration. A study in 24 healthy male subjects was conducted to compare mean zolpidem plasma concentration-time profiles obtained after single oral administration of AMBIEN CR 12.5 mg and of an immediaterelease formulation of zolpidem tartrate (10 mg). The terminal elimination half-life observed with AMBIEN CR (12.5 mg) was similar to that obtained with immediate-release zolpidem tartrate (10 mg). The mean plasma concentration-time profiles are shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Mean plasma concentration-time profiles for AMBIEN CR (12.5 mg) and immediate-release zolpidem tartrate (10 mg)

Mean plasma concentration-time profiles - Illustration

In adult and elderly patients treated with AMBIEN CR, there was no evidence of accumulation after repeated once-daily dosing for up to two weeks.

Absorption

Following administration of AMBIEN CR, administered as a single 12.5 mg dose in healthy male adult subjects, the mean peak concentration (Cmax) of zolpidem was 134 ng/mL (range: 68.9 to 197 ng/ml) occurring at a median time (Tmax) of 1.5 hours. The mean AUC of zolpidem was 740 ng·hr/mL (range: 295 to 1359 ng·hr/mL).

A food-effect study in 45 healthy subjects compared the pharmacokinetics of AMBIEN CR 12.5 mg when administered while fasting or within 30 minutes after a meal. Results demonstrated that with food, mean AUC and Cmax were decreased by 23% and 30%, respectively, while median Tmax was increased from 2 hours to 4 hours. The half-life was not changed. These results suggest that, for faster sleep onset, AMBIEN CR should not be administered with or immediately after a meal.

Distribution

Total protein binding was found to be 92.5 ± 0.1% and remained constant, independent of concentration between 40 and 790 ng/mL.

Metabolism

Zolpidem is converted to inactive metabolites that are eliminated primarily by renal excretion.

Elimination

When AMBIEN CR was administered as a single 12.5 mg dose in healthy male adult subjects, the mean zolpidem elimination half-life was 2.8 hours (range: 1.62 to 4.05 hr).

Special Populations

Elderly

In 24 elderly ( ≥ 65 years) healthy subjects administered a single 6.25 mg dose of AMBIEN CR, the mean peak concentration (Cmax) of zolpidem was 70.6 (range: 35.0 to 161) ng/mL occurring at a median time (Tmax) of 2.0 hours. The mean AUC of zolpidem was 413 ng·hr/mL (range: 124 to 1190 ng·hr/mL) and the mean elimination half-life was 2.9 hours (range: 1.59 to 5.50 hours).

Hepatic Impairment

AMBIEN CR was not studied in patients with hepatic impairment. The pharmacokinetics of an immediate-release formulation of zolpidem tartrate in eight patients with chronic hepatic insufficiency were compared to results in healthy subjects. Following a single 20-mg oral zolpidem tartrate dose, mean Cmax and AUC were found to be two times (250 vs. 499 ng/mL) and five times (788 vs. 4,203 ng·hr/mL) higher, respectively, in hepatically compromised patients. Tmax did not change. The mean half-life in cirrhotic patients of 9.9 hr (range: 4.1 to 25.8 hr) was greater than that observed in normal subjects of 2.2 hr (range: 1.6 to 2.4 hr). Dosing should be modified accordingly in patients with hepatic insufficiency [see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION].

Renal Impairment

AMBIEN CR was not studied in patients with renal impairment. The pharmacokinetics of an immediate-release formulation of zolpidem tartrate were studied in 11 patients with end-stage renal failure (mean ClCr = 6.5 ± 1.5 mL/min) undergoing hemodialysis three times a week, who were dosed with zolpidem tartrate 10 mg orally each day for 14 or 21 days. No statistically significant differences were observed for Cmax, Tmax, half-life, and AUC between the first and last day of drug administration when baseline concentration adjustments were made. Zolpidem was not hemodialyzable. No accumulation of unchanged drug appeared after 14 or 21 days. Zolpidem pharmacokinetics were not significantly different in renally-impaired patients. No dosage adjustment is necessary in patients with compromised renal function.

Drug Interactions

CNS-depressants

Co-administration of zolpidem with other CNS depressants increases the risk of CNS depression [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS]. Zolpidem tartrate was evaluated in healthy volunteers in single-dose interaction studies for several CNS drugs. Imipramine in combination with zolpidem produced no pharmacokinetic interaction other than a 20% decrease in peak levels of imipramine, but there was an additive effect of decreased alertness. Similarly, chlorpromazine in combination with zolpidem produced no pharmacokinetic interaction, but there was an additive effect of decreased alertness and psychomotor performance.

A study involving haloperidol and zolpidem revealed no effect of haloperidol on the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of zolpidem. The lack of a drug interaction following single-dose administration does not predict the absence of an effect following chronic administration.

An additive adverse effect on psychomotor performance between alcohol and oral zolpidem was demonstrated [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

Following five consecutive nightly doses at bedtime of oral zolpidem tartrate 10 mg in the presence of sertraline 50 mg (17 consecutive daily doses, at 7:00 am, in healthy female volunteers), zolpidem Cmax was significantly higher (43%) and Tmax was significantly decreased (-53%). Pharmacokinetics of sertraline and N-desmethylsertraline were unaffected by zolpidem.

A single-dose interaction study with zolpidem tartrate 10 mg and fluoxetine 20 mg at steady-state levels in male volunteers did not demonstrate any clinically significant pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interactions. When multiple doses of zolpidem and fluoxetine were given at steady state and the concentrations evaluated in healthy females, an increase in the zolpidem half-life (17%) was observed. There was no evidence of an additive effect in psychomotor performance.

Drugs that Affect Drug Metabolism via Cytochrome P450

Some compounds known to inhibit CYP3A may increase exposure to zolpidem. The effect of inhibitors of other P450 enzymes on the pharmacokinetics of zolpidem is unknown.

A single-dose interaction study with zolpidem tartrate 10 mg and itraconazole 200 mg at steadystate levels in male volunteers resulted in a 34% increase in AUC0-∞of zolpidem tartrate. There were no pharmacodynamic effects of zolpidem detected on subjective drowsiness, postural sway, or psychomotor performance.

A single-dose interaction study with zolpidem tartrate 10 mg and rifampin 600 mg at steady-state levels in female subjects showed significant reductions of the AUC (-73%), Cmax (-58%), and T™ (-36 %) of zolpidem together with significant reductions in the pharmacodynamic effects of zolpidem tartrate. Rifampin, a CYP3A4 inducer, significantly reduced the exposure to and the pharmacodynamic effects of zolpidem.

A single-dose interaction study with zolpidem tartrate 5 mg and ketoconazole, a potent CYP3A4 inhibitor, given as 200 mg twice daily for 2 days increased Cmax of zolpidem (30%) and the total AUC of zolpidem (70%) compared to zolpidem alone and prolonged the elimination half-life (30 %) along with an increase in the pharmacodynamic effects of zolpidem. Consideration should be given to using a lower dose of zolpidem when ketoconazole and zolpidem are given together.

Other Drugs with No Interactions with Zolpidem

A study involving cimetidine/zolpidem tartrate and ranitidine/zolpidem tartrate combinations revealed no effect of either drug on the pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics of zolpidem.

Zolpidem tartrate had no effect on digoxin pharmacokinetics and did not affect prothrombin time when given with warfarin in healthy subjects.

Clinical Studies

Controlled Clinical Trials

AMBIEN CR was evaluated in three placebo-controlled studies for the treatment of patients with chronic primary insomnia (as defined in the APA Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, DSM IV).

Adult outpatients (18-64 years) with primary insomnia (N=212) were evaluated in a doubleblind, randomized, parallel-group, 3-week trial comparing AMBIEN CR 12.5 mg and placebo. AMBIEN CR 12.5 mg decreased wake time after sleep onset (WASO) for the first 7 hours during the first 2 nights and for the first 5 hours after 2 weeks of treatment. AMBIEN CR 12.5 mg was superior to placebo on objective measures (polysomnography recordings) of sleep induction (by decreasing latency to persistent sleep [LPS]) during the first 2 nights of treatment and after 2 weeks of treatment. AMBIEN CR 12.5 mg was also superior to placebo on the patient reported global impression regarding the aid to sleep after the first 2 nights and after 3 weeks of treatment.

Elderly outpatients ( ≥ 65 years) with primary insomnia (N=205) were evaluated in a doubleblind, randomized, parallel-group, 3-week trial comparing AMBIEN CR 6.25 mg and placebo. AMBIEN CR 6.25 mg decreased wake time after sleep onset (WASO) for the first 6 hours during the first 2 nights and the first 4 hours after 2 weeks of treatment. AMBIEN CR 6.25 mg was superior to placebo on objective measures (polysomnography recordings) of sleep induction (by decreasing LPS) during the first 2 nights of treatment and after 2 weeks on treatment. AMBIEN CR 6.25 mg was superior to placebo on the patient reported global impression regarding the aid to sleep after the first 2 nights and after 3 weeks of treatment.

In both studies, in patients treated with AMBIEN CR, polysomnography showed increased wakefulness at the end of the night compared to placebo-treated patients.

In a 24-week double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized study in adult outpatients (18-64 years) with primary insomnia (N=1025), AMBIEN CR 12.5 mg administered as needed (3 to 7 nights per week) was superior to placebo over 24 weeks, on patient global impression regarding aid to sleep, and on patient-reported specific sleep parameters for sleep induction and sleep maintenance with no significant increased frequency of drug intake observed over time.

Studies Pertinent To Safety Concerns For Sedative/Hypnotic Drugs

Next-day Residual Effects

In five clinical studies [three controlled studies in adults (18-64 years of age) administered AMBIEN CR 12.5 mg and two controlled studies in the elderly ( ≥ 65 years of age) administered AMBIEN CR 6.25 mg or 12.5 mg], the effect of AMBIEN CR on vigilance, memory, or motor function were assessed using neurocognitive tests. In these studies, no significant decrease in performance was observed eight hours after a nighttime dose. In addition, no evidence of next-day residual effects was detected with AMBIEN CR 12.5 mg and 6.25 mg using self-ratings of sedation.

During the 3-week studies, next-day somnolence was reported by 15% of the adult patients who received 12.5 mg AMBIEN CR versus 2% of the placebo group; next-day somnolence was reported by 6% of the elderly patients who received 6.25 mg AMBIEN CR versus 5% of the placebo group [see ADVERSE REACTIONS]. In a 6-month study, the overall incidence of next-day somnolence was 5.7% in the AMBIEN CR group as compared to 2% in the placebo group.

Rebound Effects

Rebound insomnia, defined as a dose-dependent worsening in sleep parameters (latency, sleep efficiency, and number of awakenings) compared with baseline following discontinuation of treatment, is observed with short- and intermediate-acting hypnotics. In the two 3-week placebo-controlled studies in patients with primary insomnia, a rebound effect was only observed on the first night after abrupt discontinuation of AMBIEN CR. On the second night, there was no worsening compared to baseline in the AMBIEN CR group.

In a 6-month placebo-controlled study in which AMBIEN CR was taken as needed (3 to 7 nights per week), within the first month a rebound effect was observed for Total Sleep Time (not for WASO) during the first night off medication. After this first month period, no further rebound insomnia was observed. After final treatment discontinuation no rebound was observed.

Last reviewed on RxList: 10/17/2014
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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