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Amoxapine

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Amoxapine

Amoxapine Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Amoxapine (Brand Names: Asendin) is used to treat symptoms of depression, anxiety, or agitation. It is a tricyclic antidepressant. Common side effects include drowsiness, dizziness, difficulty urinating, dry mouth, constipation, headache, weakness, blurred vision, or changes in appetite/weight as your body gets used to the medication. Rarely, patients younger than 25 taking antidepressants may experience worsening depression or suicidal thoughts/attempts. Tell your doctor if this occurs.

The usual starting dosage of amoxapine is 50 mg two or three times daily. Depending upon tolerance, dosage may be increased to 100 mg two or three times daily by the end of the first week. Amoxapine may interact with SSRI antidepressants, cimetidine, or heart rhythm medications. Many other medicines can interact with amoxapine. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Amoxapine should be used only when prescribed during pregnancy. Infants born to mothers who have taken similar medications during pregnancy may have problems such as very deep sleep, trouble urinating, shaking (tremors), and seizures. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. This medication passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Amoxapine Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Patient Information in Detail?

Easy-to-read and understand detailed drug information and pill images for the patient or caregiver from Cerner Multum.

Amoxapine in Detail - Patient Information: Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Stop taking amoxapine and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, tremors, feeling like you might pass out;
  • pounding heartbeats or fluttering in your chest;
  • chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling;
  • sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; or
  • sudden severe headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • drowsiness, dizziness, headache, tired feeling;
  • feeling restless or nervous;
  • dry mouth, blurred vision;
  • mild nausea, constipation;
  • increased appetite, weight changes;
  • increased sweating; or
  • sleep problems (insomnia), night mares.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Amoxapine (Amoxapine Tablets) »

What is Patient Information Overview?

A concise overview of the drug for the patient or caregiver from First DataBank.

Amoxapine Overview - Patient Information: Side Effects

SIDE EFFECTS: See also the Warning section.

Drowsiness, dizziness, difficulty urinating, dry mouth, constipation, headache, weakness, blurred vision, or changes in appetite/weight may occur as your body gets used to the medication. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

To relieve dry mouth, suck on (sugarless) hard candy or ice chips, chew (sugarless) gum, drink water or use a saliva substitute. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

To prevent constipation, maintain a diet adequate in fiber, drink plenty of water, and exercise. If you become constipated while using this drug, consult your pharmacist for help in selecting a laxative (e.g., stimulant-type with stool softener).

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor immediately if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: dizziness/fainting, feelings of restlessness, mental/mood changes (e.g., confusion, depression, hallucinations, nervousness), numbness/tingling of the hands/feet, ringing in the ears, shakiness (tremors), stomach/abdominal pain, severe vomiting/constipation.

Seek immediate medical attention if any of these rare but very serious side effects occur: chest pain, jaw/left arm pain, slow/fast/irregular heartbeat, pain/redness/swelling of arms/legs, seizures, severe headache, weakness on one side of the body, vision changes, slurred speech.

In rare instances, this medication may increase your level of a certain natural chemical made by the body (prolactin). For females, this increase in prolactin may result in unwanted breast milk, missing/stopped periods, or difficulty becoming pregnant. For males, it may result in decreased sexual ability, inability to produce sperm, or enlarged breasts. If you develop any of these symptoms, tell your doctor immediately.

This drug may rarely cause a condition known as tardive dyskinesia. In some cases, this condition may be permanent. Tell your doctor immediately if you develop any unusual/uncontrolled movements (especially of the face, mouth, tongue, arms or legs).

Amoxapine may rarely cause a serious condition called neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Seek immediate medical attention if you develop the following: fever, muscle stiffness, increased sweating, fast/irregular heartbeat, severe confusion.

This medication may rarely cause serious blood problems (e.g., agranulocytosis, thrombocytopenia) or liver problems. Seek immediate medical attention if you notice any of the following rare but very serious side effects: easy bleeding/bruising, signs of infection (e.g., fever, persistent sore throat), severe stomach/abdominal pain, dark urine, yellowing of the eyes/skin.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is unlikely, but seek immediate medical attention if it occurs. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction include: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Read the entire patient information overview for Amoxapine (Amoxapine Tablets)»

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Amoxapine FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

Adverse reactions reported in controlled studies in the United States are categorized with respect to incidence below. Following this is a listing of reactions known to occur with other antidepressant drugs of this class.

Incidence Greater Than 1%

The most frequent types of adverse reactions occurring with amoxapine (amoxapine (amoxapine tablets) tablets) in controlled clinical trials were sedative and anticholinergic: these included drowsiness (14%), dry mouth (14%), constipation (12%), and blurred vision (7%).

Less frequently reported reactions are:

CNS and Neuromuscular: anxiety, insomnia, restlessness, nervousness, palpitations, tremors, confusion, excitement, nightmares, ataxia, alterations in EEG patterns.

Allergic: edema, skin rash.

Endocrine: elevation of prolactin levels.

Gastrointestinal: nausea.

Other: dizziness, headache, fatigue, weakness, excessive appetite, increased perspiration.

Incidence Less Than 1%

Anticholinergic: disturbances of accommodation, mydriasis, delayed micturition, urinary retention, nasal stuffiness.

Cardiovascular: hypotension, hypertension, syncope, tachycardia.

Allergic: drug fever, urticaria, photosensitization, pruritus, vasculitis, hepatitis.

CNS and Neuromuscular: tingling, paresthesias of the extremities, tinnitus, disorientation, seizures, hypomania, numbness, incoordination, disturbed concentration, hyperthermia, extrapyramidal symptoms, including, tardive dyskinesia. Neuroleptic malignant syndrome has been reported. (See WARNINGS.)

Hematologic: leukopenia, agranulocytosis.

Gastrointestinal: epigastric distress, vomiting, flatulence, abdominal pain, peculiar taste, diarrhea.

Endocrine: increased or decreased libido, impotence, menstrual irregularity, breast enlargement and galactorrhea in the female, syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion.

Other: lacrimation, weight gain or loss, altered liver function, painful ejaculation.

Drug Relationship Unknown

The following reactions have been reported rarely, and occurred under uncontrolled circumstances where a drug relationship was difficult to assess. These observations are listed to serve as alerting information to physicians.

Anticholinergic: paralytic ileus.

Cardiovascular: atrial arrhythmias (including atrial fibrillation), myocardial infarction, stroke, heart block.

CNS and Neuromuscular: hallucinations.

Hematologic: thrombocytopenia, eosinophilia, purpura, petechiae.

Gastrointestinal: parotid swelling.

Endocrine: change in blood glucose levels.

Other: pancreatitis, hepatitis, jaundice, urinary frequency, testicular swelling, anorexia, alopecia.

Additional Adverse Reactions

The following reactions have been reported with other antidepressant drugs.

Anticholinergic: sublingual adenitis, dilation of the urinary tract.

CNS and Neuromuscular: delusions.

Gastrointestinal: stomatitis, black tongue.

Endocrine: gynecomastia.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Amoxapine (Amoxapine Tablets) »

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Amoxapine - User Reviews

Amoxapine User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Amoxapine sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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