Analpram HC

Analpram HC®
(hydrocortisone acetate 2.5% pramoxine HCl 1%) Cream 2.5%

DRUG DESCRIPTION

Analpram HC® Cream 2.5% is a topical preparation containing hydrocortisone acetate 2.5% w/w and pramoxine hydrochloride 1% w/w in a hydrophilic cream base containing stearic acid, cetyl alcohol, Aquaphor®, isopropyl palmitate, polyoxyl 40 stearate, propylene glycol, potassium sorbate, sorbic acid, triethanolamine lauryl sulfate, and purified water.

Topical corticosteroids are anti-inflammatory and anti-pruritic agents. The structural formula, the chemical name, molecular formula and molecular weight for active ingredients are presented below.

Hydrocortisone acetate Structural Formula Illustration

hydrocortisone acetate Pregn-4-ene-3,20-dione, 21-(acetyloxy)-11, 17-dihydroxy-, (11-beta)- C23H32O6; mol, wt, 404.50

Premoxine hydrochloride Structural Formula Illustration

premoxine hydrochloride 4-(3-(p-butoxyphenoxy)propyl) morpholine hydrochloride C17H27NO3•HCl; mol. Wt:329.87

What are the possible side effects of hydrocortisone pramoxine topical?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • blurred vision, or seeing halos around lights;
  • uneven heartbeats;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • ongoing headache;
  • weight gain, puffiness in your face;
  • increased thirst or urination, weight loss, unusual weakness;
  • fever, sore throat, tired...

Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Analpram HC »

Last reviewed on RxList: 9/21/2011
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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