font size

Anorexia Nervosa (cont.)

Medical Author:
Medical Editor:

What are anorexia symptoms, signs, and complications (physical)?

Most of the medical complications of anorexia nervosa result from starvation. Few organs are spared the progressive deterioration brought about by anorexia.

  • Heart and circulatory system: Although usually not life-threatening, an abnormally slow heart rate (bradycardia) and unusually low blood pressure (hypotension) are frequent manifestations of starvation and are commonly associated with anorexia. Of greater significance are disturbances in the heart rhythm (arrhythmia). A reduction in the work capacity of the heart is associated with severe weight loss and starvation.
  • Gastrointestinal complications are also associated with anorexia. Constipation and abdominal pain are the most common symptoms. The rate at which food is absorbed into the body is slowed down. Starvation and overuse of laxatives can seriously disrupt the body's normal functions involved in the elimination process. While liver function is generally found to be normal, there is evidence that some individuals with anorexia develop changes in liver enzyme levels and overall damage to the liver.
  • The glandular (endocrine) system in the body is profoundly affected by anorexia. The complex physical and chemical processes involved in the maintenance of life can be disrupted, with serious consequences. Disturbances in the menstrual cycle are frequent, and secondary amenorrhea (absence of menstrual periods) affects about 90% of adolescent girls with anorexia. Menstrual periods typically return with weight gain and successful treatment. Hormonal imbalances are found in men with anorexia as well. Continual restrictive eating can trick the thyroid into thinking that the body is starving, causing it to slow down in an attempt to preserve calories. When anorexia occurs in a person who also has diabetes mellitus (a tendency toward very high blood sugar levels), the risk of death is higher than in people who have either anorexia or diabetes mellitus alone.
  • Kidney (renal) function may appear normal. However, there are significant changes in kidney function in many people with anorexia, resulting in increased or decreased urination or potentially fatal potassium deficiency. Other long-term effects may include diabetes insipidus, which is characterized by excessive urination and extreme thirst.
  • Bone density loss (osteopenia or thinning of the bones) is a significant complication of anorexia, since women acquire 40%-60% of their bone mass during adolescence. Studies have shown that bone loss can occur fairly rapidly in girls with anorexia. While some studies have shown that bone density may be restored if overall health improves and anorexia is successfully treated, other studies suggest that an increased risk for fracture may persist later in life.
  • Anorexics who abuse a large quantity of laxatives or who frequently vomit are in danger of electrolyte imbalance, which can have life-threatening consequences.
  • Anemia is frequently found in anorexic patients. In addition to having fewer red blood cells, people with anorexia tend to have lower numbers of white blood cells, which play a major role in protecting the body from developing infections. Suppressed immunity and a high risk for infection are suspected but not clinically proven dangers of anorexia.
  • Contrary to what might be expected, anorexia nervosa is associated with high total cholesterol levels.
  • Other physical symptoms, other than the obvious loss of weight, can be seen. Anorexia can cause dry, flaky skin that takes on a yellow tinge. Fine, downy hair grows on the face, back, arms, and legs. Despite this new hair growth, loss of hair on the head is not uncommon. Nails can become brittle. Frequent vomiting can erode dental enamel and eventually lead to tooth loss. People with anorexia might also develop trouble maintaining a consistent body temperature.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/6/2014

Patient Comments

Viewers share their comments

Anorexia Nervosa - Treatments Question: What treatment has been effective for your anorexia?
Anorexia - Share Your Experience Question: Please share your experience with anorexia nervosa.
Anorexia - Psychological Symptoms Question: What psychological or behavioral symptoms did you experience with anorexia nervosa?
Anorexia - Physical Symptoms Question: Describe the physical symptoms you experienced with anorexia nervosa.
Anorexia - Prognosis Question: Did you, a friend, or relative have anorexia? Please share the prognosis or outcome.
Anorexia - Prevention Question: Please share suggestions for preventing anorexia nervosa.
Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/anorexia_nervosa/article.htm

Women's Health

Find out what women really need.

Anorexia Nervosa Related Articles
advertisement
advertisement
Use Pill Finder Find it Now See Interactions

Pill Identifier on RxList

  • quick, easy,
    pill identification

Find a Local Pharmacy

  • including 24 hour, pharmacies

Interaction Checker

  • Check potential drug interactions
Search the Medical Dictionary for Health Definitions & Medical Abbreviations