font size


Antimitochondrial Antibodies
(AMA)

Medical Author:
Medical Editor:

What are antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA)?

Between 95 and 98% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) have autoantibodies (antibodies to self) in their blood that react with the inner lining of mitochondria. These autoantibodies are called antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). Mitochondria are the energy factories present inside all of our cells, not just the cells of the liver or bile ducts. (The mitochondria use the oxygen carried in the blood from the lungs as a fuel to generate energy.) AMA actually bind to protein antigens that are contained in multienzyme complexes (packages of enzymes) within the inner lining of the mitochondria. These multienzyme complexes produce key chemical reactions necessary for life. The complexes are referred to as multienzyme because they are made up of multiple enzyme units.

AMA specifically react against a component of this multienzyme complex called E2. In PBC, AMA preferentially react with the E2 component of one of the multienzymes that is called the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC). Accordingly, the antigen is designated as PDC-E2. The practical importance of all of this is that the PDC-E2 antigen is now used, as discussed below, in a diagnostic test for PBC. The PDC-E2 antigen is also referred to as M2, a term introduced to designate it as the second mitochondrial antigen discovered by researchers interested in PBC.

Do AMA cause the destruction of the bile ducts in PBC?

In as much as the bile ducts are the main targets of destruction in PBC, the question was asked whether the AMA reacts with the epithelial cells that line the bile ducts. So, investigators prepared antibodies to PDC-E2. As expected, they found that these antibodies bound to the mitochondria within the cells. But, sure enough, recent information suggests that these AMA autoantibodies also bind to PDC-E2 that lies outside the mitochondria, yet within the epithelial cells lining the bile ducts.

This accumulation of PDC-E2 within the biliary epithelial cells is observed exclusively in the livers of patients with PBC, and not in normal livers or in livers from patients with any other types of liver disease. Interestingly, it was also observed in the livers of those two to five percent of PBC patients who do not have AMA in their blood (AMA-negative PBC). Furthermore, intense binding of these antibodies to biliary epithelial cells was also found to be the earliest indication of recurrence of PBC in a transplanted liver. (PBC is sometimes treated by liver transplantation.)

Nevertheless, no evidence exists that the AMA itself causes the destruction of the biliary epithelial cells lining the small bile ducts. Neither the presence nor the amount (titer) of AMA in the blood appears to be related to the inflammatory destruction of the bile ducts. Indeed, immunization of animals with PDC-E2 antigen results in production of AMA without any liver or bile duct damage (pathology).

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/21/2014

Patient Comments

Viewers share their comments

Antimitichondrial Antibodies - Patient Experience Question: Did you test positive for antimitochondrial antibodies? How did your treatment progress after that point?
Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/antimitochondrial_antibodies/article.htm

GI Disorders

Get the latest treatment options.

advertisement
advertisement
Use Pill Finder Find it Now See Interactions

Pill Identifier on RxList

  • quick, easy,
    pill identification

Find a Local Pharmacy

  • including 24 hour, pharmacies

Interaction Checker

  • Check potential drug interactions
Search the Medical Dictionary for Health Definitions & Medical Abbreviations

NIH talks about Ebola on WebMD