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Antizol

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Antizol

Antizol®
(fomepizole) Injection Sterile

Caution: Must be diluted prior to use.

DRUG DESCRIPTION

Antizol® (fomepizole) Injection is a competitive inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase.

The chemical name of fomepizole is 4-methylpyrazole. It has the molecular formula C4H6N2 and a molecular weight of 82.1. The structural formula is:

ANTIZOL (fomepizole) Structural Formula Illustration

It is a clear to yellow liquid at room temperature. Its melting point is 25°C (77°F) and it may present in a solid form at room temperature. Fomepizole is soluble in water and very soluble in ethanol, diethyl ether, and chloroform. Each vial contains 1.5 mL (1 g/mL) of fomepizole.

What are the possible side effects of fomepizole (Antizol)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Tell your caregivers at once if you have any of these serious side effects (some are effects of the poison and not of fomepizole):

  • burning, swelling, or skin changes where the medicine was injected;
  • urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • fast or slow heart rate, feeling like you may pass out; or
  • skin rash, bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness.

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Read All Potential Side Effects and See Pictures of Antizol »

Last reviewed on RxList: 11/6/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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