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Arranon

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Arranon

Disclaimer

Arranon Consumer

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs.

NELARABINE - INJECTION

(nel-AR-a-been)

COMMON BRAND NAME(S): Arranon

WARNING: Infrequently, serious nervous system problems have occurred with the use of this medication. The risk may be increased if you have previously received chemotherapy injection into a certain part of the spine (intrathecal) or radiation treatment to the head/spine area. Tell your doctor immediately if you notice any symptoms of nervous system problems including: extreme sleepiness, confusion, numbness/tingling in hands/feet, loss of coordination, muscle weakness, or unsteadiness while walking. Seek immediate medical attention if any of the following symptoms occur: inability to move (paralysis), seizure. These symptoms may not go away completely even when treatment with nelarabine is stopped. Consult your doctor for details.

USES: This medication is used to treat certain cancers (leukemia, lymphoma). Nelarabine is a chemotherapy drug that works by slowing or stopping the growth of cancer cells.

HOW TO USE: Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using nelarabine and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

This medication is given by slow injection into a vein, usually by a health care professional. Each treatment period is called a cycle. In adults, it is usually given on days 1, 3, and 5 of each treatment cycle or as directed by your doctor. In children, it is usually given daily for 5 days in a row during each treatment cycle or as directed by the doctor.

The dosage is based on your medical condition, age, body size, and response to treatment. Your doctor will check your blood counts to make sure you can receive your next cycle. Keep all medical and laboratory appointments.

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