May 2, 2016

Artichoke

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How does Artichoke work?

Artichoke has chemicals that can reduce nausea and vomiting, spasms, and intestinal gas. These chemicals have also been shown to lower cholesterol.

Are there safety concerns?

Artichoke is LIKELY SAFE when consumed in amounts used in foods.

Artichoke is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth as a medicine. It has been used safely in research for up to 23 months.

In some people, artichoke can cause some side effects such as intestinal gas and allergic reactions. People at the greatest risk of allergic reactions are those who are allergic to plants such as marigolds, daisies, and other similar herbs.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking artichoke if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bile duct obstruction: There is concern that artichoke might worsen bile duct obstruction by increasing bile flow. If you have this condition, don't use artichoke without first discussing your decision with your healthcare provider.

Allergy to ragweed and related plants: Artichoke may cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking artichoke.

Gallstones: Artichoke might make gallstones worse by increasing bile flow; use artichoke with caution.

Dosing considerations for Artichoke.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • For heartburn: 320-640 mg artichoke leaf extract three times daily. Some studies have used a specific extract called ALE LI 220 (HeparSL forte, Berlin, Germany).
  • For high cholesterol: 1800-1920 mg per day of a specific artichoke extract (Valverde Artischocke, Novartis Consumer Health) in 2 to 3 divided doses. Products containing 60-1500 mg per day of the active ingredient, cynarin, have also been used.

Therapeutic Research Faculty copyright

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Cholesterol Management

Tips to keep it under control.

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