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Ascorbic Acid

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Ascorbic Acid

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

In humans, an exogenous source of ascorbic acid (vitamin c) is required for collagen formation and tissue repair. Ascorbic acid (vitamin c) is reversibly oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid (vitamin c) in the body. These two forms of the vitamin are believed to be important in oxidation-reduction reactions. The vitamin is involved in tyrosine metabolism, conversion of folic acid to folinic acid, carbohydrate metabolism, synthesis of lipids and proteins, iron metabolism, resistance to infections, and cellular respiration.

Ascorbic acid (vitamin c) deficiency results in scurvy. Collagenous structures are primarily affected, and lesions develop in bones and blood vessels. Administration of ascorbic acid (vitamin c) completely reverses the symptoms of ascorbic acid (vitamin c) deficiency.

Last reviewed on RxList: 10/3/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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