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Ascorbic Acid

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Ascorbic Acid

Indications
Dosage
How Supplied

INDICATIONS

Vitamin C is recommended for the prevention and treatment of scurvy. Its parenteral administration is desirable for patients with an acute deficiency or for those whose absorption of orally ingested ascorbic acid (vitamin c) is uncertain.

Symptoms of mild deficiency may include faulty bone and tooth development, gingivitis, bleeding gums, and loosened teeth. Febrile states, chronic illness, and infection (pneumonia, whooping cough, tuberculosis, diphtheria, sinusitis, rheumatic fever, etc.) increase the need for ascorbic acid (vitamin c) .

Hemovascular disorders, burns, delayed fracture and wound healing are indications for an increase in the daily intake.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Ascorbic acid (vitamin c) is usually administered orally. When oral administration is not feasible or when malabsorption is suspected, the drug may be administered IM, IV, or subcutaneously. When given parenterally, utilization of the vitamin reportedly is best after IM administration and that is the preferred parenteral route.

For intravenous injection, dilution into a large volume parenteral such as Normal Saline, Water for Injection, or Glucose is recommended to minimize the adverse reactions associated with intravenous injection.

The average protective dose of vitamin C for adults is 70 to 150 mg daily. In the presence of scurvy, doses of 300 mg to 1 g daily are recommended. However, as much as 6 g has been administered parenterally to normal adults without evidence of toxicity.

To enhance wound healing, doses of 300 to 500 mg daily for a week or ten days both preoperatively and postoperatively are generally considered adequate, although considerably larger amounts have been recommended. In the treatment of burns, doses are governed by the extent of tissue injury. For severe burns, daily doses of 1 to 2 g are recommended. In other conditions in which the need for vitamin C is increased, three to five times the daily optimum allowances appear to be adequate.

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever the solution and container permit.

HOW SUPPLIED

Ascorbic Acid (vitamin c) Injection, USP, 250 mg/mL is available in 2 mL ampules, in cartons of 25.

PROTECT FROM HEAT AND LIGHT. Store at controlled room temperature 15°- 30° C (59°- 86° F).

Pressure may develop within the ampule upon long storage. Precautions should be taken to wrap the container in a protective covering while it is being opened.

CAUTION: Federal law prohibits dispensing without prescription.

Manufactured by: Steris Laboratories, Inc. Phoenix, Arizona 85043, USA. For: Mallinckrodt, Inc. St. Louis, MO 63134. FDA Rev date: n/a

Last reviewed on RxList: 10/3/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Indications
Dosage
How Supplied
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