November 26, 2015
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Ascorbic Acid

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Ascorbic Acid



Diabetics, patients prone to recurrent renal calculi, those undergoing stool occult blood tests, and those on sodium-restricted diets or anticoagulant therapy should not take excessive doses of vitamin C over an extended period of time.


General Precautions

Too-rapid intravenous injection is to be avoided.

Laboratory Tests

Diabetics taking more than 500 mg vitamin C daily may obtain false readings of their urinary glucose test. No exogenous vitamin C should be ingested for 48 to 72 hours before amine-dependent stool occult blood tests are conducted because possible false-negative results may occur.

Usage in Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category C.' Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with Ascorbic Acid (vitamin c) Injection. It is also not known whether Ascorbic Acid (vitamin c) Injection can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproduction capacity. Ascorbic Acid (vitamin c) Injection should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.

Nursing Mothers

Caution should be exercised when Ascorbic Acid (vitamin c) Injection is administered to a nursing woman.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Last reviewed on RxList: 10/3/2008


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