Recommended Topic Related To:

Atenolol

"What are beta blockers?

The class of drugs called beta blockers were given their name because this class of medications counteracts the stimulatory effects of epinephrine (adrenaline) on the so-called beta-adrenergic receptors found"...

Tenormin

Tenormin

Atenolol Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

Tenormin (atenolol) (and Tenormin IV) is a beta blocking drug used mainly for control of hypertension, angina, for management of acute myocardial infarction and occasionally for thyroid storm management. Tenormin is available as generic atenolol in tablets and IV. Side effects of Tenormin may include dizziness, lethargy, mild bradycardia, depression, and mild shortness of breath for both preparations. Patients with bronchospastic disease, in general, should not take Tenormin or other beta-blockers.

Tenormin is available in 25, 50 and 100 mg strength tablets; it is also available vials of 5 mg atenolol in ten ml of citrate-buffered solution for intravenous injection. The IV preparation should only be administered by trained personnel. The usual dose for tablets begins at 25 mg once or twice per day and is modified by patient response to the medication. The following information applies to both the tablet and IV forms of atenolol. Serious side effects of Tenormin may include heart arrhythmias, hypotension, pulmonary emboli, chest pain, and bronchospasm. Use with calcium channel blockers (CCBs) may precipitate bradycardia. This medication should be used during pregnancy only when clearly needed. It may harm an unborn baby. This medication passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Consult the doctor before breastfeeding. Women taking Tenormin should discuss the risks and benefits with their doctor. Safety and effectiveness has not been established in pediatric patients.

Our Tenormin Side Effects Drug Center provide a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Patient Information in Detail?

Easy-to-read and understand detailed drug information and pill images for the patient or caregiver from Cerner Multum.

Atenolol in Detail - Patient Information: Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • slow or uneven heartbeats;
  • feeling light-headed, fainting;
  • feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion;
  • swelling of your ankles or feet;
  • nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • depression; or
  • cold feeling in your hands and feet.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • tired feeling; or
  • anxiety, nervousness.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Atenolol (Atenolol Tablets) »

What is Patient Information Overview?

A concise overview of the drug for the patient or caregiver from First DataBank.

Atenolol Overview - Patient Information: Side Effects

SIDE EFFECTS: See also Warning and Precautions sections.

Dizziness, lightheadedness, tiredness, and nausea may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

To reduce the risk of dizziness and lightheadedness, get up slowly when rising from a sitting or lying position.

This drug may reduce blood flow to your hands and feet, causing them to feel cold. Smoking may worsen this effect. Dress warmly and avoid tobacco use.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Tell your doctor right away if any of these unlikely but serious side effects occur: very slow heartbeat, severe dizziness, fainting, trouble breathing, blue fingers/toes, mental/mood changes (such as confusion, mood swings, depression).

Although this medication may be used to treat heart failure, some people may rarely develop new or worsening symptoms of heart failure. Tell your doctor right away if you experience any of these unlikely but serious side effects: swelling ankles/feet, severe tiredness, shortness of breath, unexplained/sudden weight gain.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any of the following symptoms of a serious allergic reaction: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

In the US -

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Read the entire patient information overview for Atenolol (Atenolol Tablets)»

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Atenolol FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

Most adverse effects have been mild and transient.

The frequency estimates in the following table were derived from controlled studies in hypertensive patients in which adverse reactions were either volunteered by the patient (US studies) or elicited, eg, by checklist (foreign studies). The reported frequency of elicited adverse effects was higher for both TENORMIN (atenolol tablets) and placebo-treated patients than when these reactions were volunteered. Where frequency of adverse effects of TENORMIN (atenolol tablets) and placebo is similar, causal relationship to TENORMIN (atenolol tablets) is uncertain.

  Volunteered
(US Studies)
Total -Volunteered and Elicited
(Foreign+ US Studies)
Atenolol
(n=164)
%
Placebo
(n=206)
%
Atenolol
(n=399)
%
Placebo
(n=407)
%
CARDIOVASCULAR
  Bradycardia 3 0 3 0
  Cold Extremities 0 0.5 12 5
  Postural Hypotension 2 1 4 5
  Leg Pain 0 0.5 3 1
CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM/NEURO MUSCULAR
  Dizziness 4 1 13 6
  Vertigo 2 0.5 2 0.2
  Light-headedness 1 0 3 0.7
  Tiredness 0.6 0.5 26 13
  Fatigue 3 1 6 5
  Lethargy 1 0 3 0.7
  Drowsiness 0.6 0 2 0.5
  Depression 0.6 0.5 12 9
  Dreaming 0 0 3 1
GASTROINTESTINAL
  Diarrhea 2 0 3 2
  Nausea 4 1 3 1
RESPIRATORY see WARNINGS)
  Wheeziness 0 0 3 3
  Dyspnea 0.6 1 6 4

Acute Myocardial Infarction

In a series of investigations in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction, bradycardia and hypotension occurred more commonly, as expected for any beta blocker, in atenolol-treated patients than in control patients. However, these usually responded to atropine and/or to withholding further dosage of atenolol. The incidence of heart failure was not increased by atenolol. Inotropic agents were infrequently used. The reported frequency of these and other events occurring during these investigations is given in the following table.

In a study of 477 patients, the following adverse events were reported during either intravenous and/or oral atenolol administration:

  Conventional Therapy Plus Atenolol Conventional Therapy Alone

(n=244)

(n=233)
Bradycardia 43 (18%) 24 (10%)
Hypotension 60 (25%) 34 (15%)
Bronchospasm 3 (1.2%) 2 (0.9%)
Heart Failure 46 (19%) 56 (24%)
Heart Block BBB + Major 11 (4.5%) 10 (4.3%)
Axis Deviation Supraventricular 16 (6.6%) 28 (12%)
Tachycardia 28 (11.5%) 45 (19%)
Atrial Fibrillation 12 (5%) 29 (11%)
Atrial Flutter Ventricular 4 (1.6%) 7 (3%)
Tachycardia 39 (16%) 52 (22%)
Cardiac Reinfarction 0 (0%) 6 (2.6%)
Total Cardiac Arrests Nonfatal Cardiac 4 (1.6%) 16 (6.9%)
Arrests 4 (1.6%) 12 (5.1%)
Deaths 7 (2.9%) 16 (6.9%)
Cardiogenic Shock 1 (0.4%) 4 (1.7%)
Development of Ventricular Septal Defect 0 (0%) 2 (0.9%)
Development of Mitral Regurgitation 0 (0%) 2 (0.9%)
Renal Failure 1 (0.4%) 0 (0%)
Pulmonary Emboli 3 (1.2%) 0 (0%)

In the subsequent International Study of Infarct Survival (ISIS-1) including over 16,000 patients of whom 8,037 were randomized to receive TENORMIN (atenolol tablets) treatment, the dosage of intravenous and subsequent oral TENORMIN (atenolol tablets) was either discontinued or reduced for the following reasons:

  Reasons for Reduced Dosage
IV Atenolol Reduced Dose (<5 mg)* Oral Partial Dose
Hypotension/Bradycardia 105 (1.3%) 1168 (14.5%)
Cardiogenic Shock 4 (.04%) 35 (.44%)
Reinfarction 0 (0%) 5 (.06%)
Cardiac Arrest 5 (.06%) 28 (.34%)
Heart Block (> first 5 (.06%) 143 (1.7%)
degree)        
Cardiac Failure 1 (.01%) 233 (2.9%)
Arrhythmias 3 (.04%) 22 (.27%)
Bronchospasm 1 (.01%) 50 (.62%)
*Full dosage was 10 mg and some patients received less than 10 mg but more than 5 mg.

During postmarketing experience with TENORMIN (atenolol tablets) , the following have been reported in temporal relationship to the use of the drug: elevated liver enzymes and/or bilirubin, hallucinations, headache, impotence, Peyronie's disease, postural hypotension which may be associated with syncope, psoriasiform rash or exacerbation of psoriasis, psychoses, purpura, reversible alopecia, thrombocytopenia, visual disturbance, sick sinus syndrome, and dry mouth. TENORMIN (atenolol tablets) , like other beta blockers, has been associated with the development of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), lupus syndrome, and Raynaud's phenomenon.

Potential Adverse Effects

In addition, a variety of adverse effects have been reported with other beta-adrenergic blocking agents, and may be considered potential adverse effects of TENORMIN (atenolol tablets) .

Hematologic: Agranulocytosis.

Allergic: Fever, combined with aching and sore throat, laryngospasm, and respiratory distress.

Central Nervous System: Reversible mental depression progressing to catatonia; an acute reversible syndrome characterized by disorientation of time and place; short-term memory loss; emotional lability with slightly clouded sensorium; and, decreased performance on neuropsychometrics.

Gastrointestinal: Mesenteric arterial thrombosis, ischemic colitis.

Other: Erythematous rash.

Miscellaneous: There have been reports of skin rashes and/or dry eyes associated with the use of beta-adrenergic blocking drugs. The reported incidence is small, and in most cases, the symptoms have cleared when treatment was withdrawn. Discontinuance of the drug should be considered if any such reaction is not otherwise explicable. Patients should be closely monitored following cessation of therapy. (See INDICATIONS.)

The oculomucocutaneous syndrome associated with the beta blocker practolol has not been reported with TENORMIN (atenolol tablets) . Furthermore, a number of patients who had previously demonstrated established practolol reactions were transferred to TENORMIN (atenolol tablets) therapy with subsequent resolution or quiescence of the reaction.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Atenolol (Atenolol Tablets) »

A A A

Tenormin - User Reviews

Tenormin User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Tenormin sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Hypertension

Get tips on handling your hypertension.

advertisement
advertisement
Use Pill Finder Find it Now See Interactions

Pill Identifier on RxList

  • quick, easy,
    pill identification

Find a Local Pharmacy

  • including 24 hour, pharmacies

Interaction Checker

  • Check potential drug interactions
Search the Medical Dictionary for Health Definitions & Medical Abbreviations