May 25, 2016
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Atgam

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Atgam

Warnings
Precautions

WARNINGS

Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section.

PRECAUTIONS

Hypersensitivity

Serious immune-mediated reactions have been reported with the use of ATGAM. Clinical signs associated with anaphylaxis, other infusion associated reactions, and serum sickness have been reported.

Discontinue ATGAM if anaphylaxis occurs. A systemic reaction such as a generalized rash, tachycardia, dyspnea, hypotension, or anaphylaxis precludes any additional administration of ATGAM.

Skin Testing

To identify those at greatest risk of systemic anaphylaxis, skin testing potential recipients is strongly recommended before commencing treatment. A conservative, conventional approach would first employ epicutaneous (prick) testing with undiluted ATGAM. If the subject does not show a wheal ten minutes after pricking, proceed to intradermal testing with 0.02 mL of a 1:1000 v/v (volume/volume) saline dilution of ATGAM with a separate saline control injection of similar volume. Read the result at 10 minutes: a wheal at the ATGAM site 3 or more mm larger in diameter than that at the saline control site (or a positive prick test) suggests clinical sensitivity and an increased possibility of a systemic allergic reaction should the drug be dosed intravenously.

The predictive value of this test has not been proven clinically. Allergic reactions such as anaphylaxis have occurred in patients whose skin test is negative. Also, skin testing done as described above will not predict for later development of serum sickness. In the presence of a locally positive skin test to ATGAM, serious consideration to alternative forms of therapy should be given. The risk to benefit ratio must be weighed. If therapy with ATGAM is deemed appropriate following a locally positive skin test, treatment should be administered in a setting where intensive life support facilities are immediately available and a physician familiar with the treatment of potentially life threatening allergic reactions is in attendance.

Transmissible Infectious Agents

Because ATGAM is made from equine and human blood components, it may carry a risk of transmitting infectious agents, e.g., viruses, and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent.

No cases of transmission of viral diseases or CJD have been associated with the use of ATGAM.

All infections suspected by a physician possibly to have been transmitted by this product should be reported by the physician or other healthcare provider to Pfizer, Inc. at 1-800-438-1985.

Monitor patients for concurrent infection. Some studies have suggested an increase in the incidence of cytomegalovirus infection in patients receiving ATGAM.

Immunizations

Do not administer live vaccines to patients about to receive, receiving, or after treatment with ATGAM. Concomitant administration of ATGAM with live virus vaccines carries a potential of uncontrolled viral replication in the immunosuppressed patient. There is insufficient information to fully define the extent of the risk, or the period of time during which the risk exists. If administered, live viruses may interfere with ATGAM treatment.

Hepatic And Renal Function Tests

In patients with aplastic anemia and other hematologic abnormalities who have received ATGAM, abnormal tests of liver function (SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase) and renal function (serum creatinine) have been observed.

Nonclinical Toxicology

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment Of Fertility

Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity studies have not been conducted on ATGAM.

In fertility studies, ATGAM at doses 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg/day was administered to cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) for 14 days either before (male monkeys) or before and after (female monkeys) cohabitation with untreated mates. ATGAM treatment was not associated with male or female hormonal or copulation behavior changes. A decrease in fertility index in female monkeys receiving ATGAM was seen. Female toxicity, including death, was observed with ATGAM doses of ≥ 20 mg/kg/day. While the etiology of this toxicity is uncertain, it may be attributed to hemolytic anemia due to cross-reactivity of ATGAM to a monkey red blood antigen.

In embryo-fetal toxicity studies, ATGAM was administered to rats and cynomolgus monkeys for 11 and 16 days, respectively during organogenesis. In rats, hypoplastic cervical vertebrae, a finding consistent with delayed skeletal development, were observed in fetuses whose dams received ATGAM at doses of 100 mg/kg/day during organogenesis. In monkey reproduction studies, maternal toxicity (vaginal bleeding, decreased body weight and loss of appetite) was observed with ATGAM doses ≥ 20 mg/kg/day after 16 days of dosing. Fetal deaths occurred in dams treated with 20 mg/kg/day ATGAM earlier in organogenesis (days 20–35), but not when treatment was given at a later part of organogenesis (days 35–50). The maternal and fetal deaths were attributed to maternal anemia due to red blood cell antigen that humans do not share. Therefore, this toxicity is not considered relevant to human fetal development.

Use In Specific Populations

Pregnancy

ATGAM was not teratogenic in rats or monkeys at a dose up to 20 mg/kg. However, 20 mg/kg/day ATGAM for 16 days during organogenesis in cynomolgus monkeys was fetotoxic. No fetal or maternal toxicity was seen with 10 mg/kg/day ATGAM administered for 16 days during organogenesis [see Nonclinical Toxicology].

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. It is also not known whether ATGAM can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproduction capacity.

ATGAM should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Nursing Mothers

In animal studies, a single dose of ATGAM up to 40 mg/kg was not detected at the limit of quantification in the milk of lactating cynomolgus monkeys. It is not known whether ATGAM is excreted in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk and because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing neonates and infants from ATGAM, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Pediatric Use

Experience with children has been limited. ATGAM has been administered safely to a small number of pediatric renal allograft recipients and pediatric aplastic anemia patients at dosage levels comparable to those in adults.

Geriatric Use

Clinical experience in a limited number of elderly patients ( ≥ 65 years of age) has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. The dose for an elderly patient should be selected with caution, starting at the low end of the dosage range, reflecting the greater frequency of decreased hepatic, renal, or cardiac function, and of concomitant disease or other drug therapy in this age group.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Last reviewed on RxList: 4/11/2016

Warnings
Precautions

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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