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Atripla

"For children who have had HIV-1 infection since birth, the combination drug therapies now used to treat HIV appear to protect against the heart damage seen before combination therapies were available, according to researchers in a National Instit"...

Atripla

Atripla Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir (Atripla)?

You should not take this medication if you are allergic to efavirenz (Sustiva), emtricitabine (Emtriva), or tenofovir (Viread), or if you are taking any of the following drugs:

  • cisapride (Propulsid);
  • pimozide (Orap);
  • midazolam (Versed) or triazolam (Halcion);
  • St. John's wort;
  • voriconazole (Vfend);
  • an ergot medicine such as dihydroergotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal), ergonovine (Ergotrate), ergotamine (Ergomar), or methylergonovine (Methergine);
  • lamivudine (Combivir, Epivir, Epzicom, or Trizivir); or
  • any other medicines that also contain efavirenz, emtricitabine, or tenofovir (such as Complera, Emtriva, Truvada, or Viread).

This medication should not be used in children weighing less than 88 pounds.

To make sure you can safely take this medication, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • liver or kidney disease;
  • a history of mental illness, use of antipsychotic medication, or injection drug use;
  • epilepsy or other seizure disorder;
  • osteopenia (low bone mineral density); or
  • hepatitis B or C infection.

Some people develop a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking this medication. You may be more likely to develop lactic acidosis if you are overweight or have liver disease, if you are a woman, or if you have taken HIV or AIDS medications for a long time. Talk with your doctor about your individual risk.

FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use this medication if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby. Use two forms of birth control, including a barrier form (such as a condom or diaphragm with spermicide) while you are using this medication and for at least 12 weeks after your treatment ends.

HIV can be passed to your baby if you are not properly treated during pregnancy. Take all of your HIV medicines as directed to control your infection.

Women with HIV or AIDS should not breast-feed a baby. Even if your baby is born without HIV, the virus may be passed to the baby in your breast milk.

How should I take efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir (Atripla)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label. Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Take this medication on an empty stomach at bedtime.

To be sure this medicine is helping your condition, your blood will need to be tested often. Your liver function may also need to be tested. Visit your doctor regularly.

If you have hepatitis B you may develop liver symptoms after you stop taking this medication, even months after stopping. Your doctor may want to check your liver function for several months after you stop using the medication.

This medication can cause you to have a false positive drug screening test. If you provide a urine sample for drug screening, tell the laboratory staff that you are taking efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir.

Store in the original container at room temperature, away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

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Atripla - User Reviews

Atripla User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Atripla sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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