Avita

Avita Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD

Avita (tretinoin gel) is a topical retinoid indicated for topical application in the treatment of acne vulgaris. Avita is available as a generic named tretinoin. As a side effect of Avita Gel, the skin of certain sensitive individuals may become excessively red, edematous, blistered, or crusted. If these effects occur, the medication should either be discontinued until the integrity of the skin is restored, or the medication dosing frequency should be adjusted temporarily to a level the patient can tolerate.

Avita Gel is available in 0.025% strength in quantities of 20g and 45g. Avita Gel should be applied once a day, in the evening, to the skin where acne lesions appear, using enough to cover the entire affected area lightly. Application may cause a transient feeling of warmth or slight stinging. Topical medication, medicated or abrasive soaps and cleansers, soaps and cosmetics that have strong drying effects and products with high concentrations of alcohol, astringents, spices or lime should be used with caution because of possible interaction with tretinoin. Serious side effects may occur in the skin and are swelling and blistering skin that may become infected. Patients need to avoid getting the drug in the eyes or mucus membranes because these structures may be damaged. AVITA GEL IS FLAMMABLE. Keep the drug away from heat and flame. Keep the tube tightly closed. Avita Gel should not be used during pregnancy. It is not known whether Avita Gel is excreted in human milk. Caution should be exercised when Avita Gel is administered to a nursing woman. There are no studies available for use of Avita in pediatric patients.

Our Avita Gel Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Patient Information in Detail?

Easy-to-read and understand detailed drug information and pill images for the patient or caregiver from Cerner Multum.

Avita in Detail - Patient Information: Side Effects

Stop using this medication and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Less serious side effects may include burning, warmth, stinging, tingling, itching, redness, swelling, dryness, peeling, irritation, or discolored skin.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Avita (Tretinoin Gel) »

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Avita FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

The skin of certain sensitive individuals may become excessively red, edematous, blistered, or crusted. If these effects occur, the medication should either be discontinued until the integrity of the skin is restored, or the medication dosing frequency should be adjusted temporarily to a level the patient can tolerate. However, efficacy has not been established for lower dosing frequencies. True contact allergy to topical tretinoin is rarely encountered. Temporary hyper- or hypopigmentation has been reported with repeated application of AVITA® Gel. Some individuals have been reported to have heightened susceptibility to sunlight while under treatment with AVITA® Gel. Adverse effects of AVITA® Gel have been reversible upon discontinuation of therapy (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION Section).

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Avita (Tretinoin Gel) »

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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