September 1, 2015
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Azilect

"The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved carbidopa/levodopa enteral suspension (Duopa, AbbVie) for the treatment of motor fluctuations in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease, according to a company news release.

"...

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DRUG INTERACTIONS: Drug interactions may change how your medications work or increase your risk for serious side effects. This document does not contain all possible drug interactions. Keep a list of all the products you use (including prescription/nonprescription drugs and herbal products) and share it with your doctor and pharmacist. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicines without your doctor's approval.

Some products that may interact with rasagiline include: appetite suppressants (such as diethylpropion), drugs for attention deficit disorder (such as atomoxetine, methylphenidate), apraclonidine, bupropion, buspirone, cyclobenzaprine, dextromethorphan, certain herbal products (such as ephedra/ma huang), methyldopa, cold medications/nasal decongestants (such as phenylephrine, phenylpropanolamine, pseudoephedrine), street drugs (such as LSD, mescaline), stimulants (such as amphetamines, ephedrine), supplements (such as tryptophan, tyramine), tetrabenazine, certain "triptans" used to treat migraine headaches (such as rizatriptan, sumatriptan, zolmitriptan).

The risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity increases if you are also taking other drugs that increase serotonin. Examples include street drugs such as MDMA/"ecstasy," St. John's wort, tramadol, certain narcotic medications (such as fentanyl, meperidine, methadone, propoxyphene, tapentadol), certain antidepressants (including maprotiline, mirtazapine, SSRIs such as fluoxetine/paroxetine, SNRIs such as duloxetine/venlafaxine, TCAs such as amitriptyline/doxepin), other MAO inhibitors (isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue, moclobemide, phenelzine, procarbazine, selegiline, tranylcypromine), among others. The risk of serotonin syndrome/toxicity may be more likely when you start or increase the dose of these drugs.

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are using any of the medications listed above within the 2 weeks before, during, or after treatment with rasagiline. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have taken fluoxetine within 5 weeks before starting rasagiline. Discuss with your doctor how much time to wait between starting or stopping any of these drugs and taking rasagiline.

Other medications can affect the removal of rasagiline from your body, which may affect how rasagiline works. Examples include cimetidine, fluvoxamine, rifampin, quinolone antibiotics (such as ciprofloxacin), anticonvulsants (such as carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine), among others.

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking other products that cause drowsiness including alcohol, antihistamines (such as cetirizine, diphenhydramine), drugs for sleep or anxiety (such as alprazolam, diazepam, zolpidem), muscle relaxants (such as carisoprodol), and narcotic pain relievers (such as codeine, hydrocodone ).

Check the labels on all your medicines (such as allergy, cough-and-cold products, diet pills) because they may contain dextromethorphan, decongestants, stimulants, or ingredients that cause drowsiness . Ask your pharmacist about the safe use of those products.

A very serious high blood pressure reaction may rarely occur if you eat a large amount of tyramine while taking rasagiline and for 2 weeks after you stop it. Avoid foods that are high in tyramine, like aged cheeses (such as Stilton). Consult your doctor or dietician about which foods you should avoid or if you do not feel well after eating or drinking certain foods while taking this medication. Get medical help right away if you notice symptoms of very high blood pressure such as unusually fast/slow heartbeat, vomiting, unexplained sweating, headache, chest pain, sudden vision changes, weakness on one side of the body, difficulty thinking, slurred speech.

OVERDOSE: If overdose is suspected, contact a poison control center or emergency room immediately. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may not appear for up to 12 hours and may include: excitement, irritability, restlessness, dizziness, weakness, drowsiness, flushing, sweating, fast heartbeat, headache, confusion, seizures.

NOTES: Do not share this medication with others.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (such as blood pressure) should be performed periodically to monitor your progress or check for side effects. Consult your doctor for more details.

People with Parkinson's disease may have an increased risk for developing skin cancer (melanoma). Tell your doctor promptly if you notice a change in the appearance or size of moles or other unusual skin changes. Ask your doctor if you should have regular skin exams.

MISSED DOSE: If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose and resume your usual dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

STORAGE: Store at room temperature away from light and moisture. Do not store in the bathroom. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.

Information last revised October 2014. Copyright(c) 2014 First Databank, Inc.

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