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Bal in Oil Ampules

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Bal in Oil Ampules

Bal in Oil Ampules Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving dimercaprol (Bal in Oil Ampules)?

If possible, before you receive dimercaprol, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have liver or kidney disease.

If you have any of these conditions, you may not be able to receive dimercaprol, or you may need a dose or special tests to safely receive this medication.

Dimercaprol may contain peanut oil. Tell your caregivers if you have a peanut allergy.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby and is not recommended in pregnant women unless clearly needed.

It is not known whether dimercaprol passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby.

In an emergency situation, it may not be possible before you are treated with dimercaprol to tell your caregivers if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. However, make sure any doctor caring for your pregnancy or your baby knows that you have received this medication.

How should I take dimercaprol (Bal in Oil Ampules)?

Dimercaprol is given as an injection into a muscle. You will receive this injection in a hospital or emergency setting.

Dimercaprol may be given for several days, depending on the type of poisoning being treated.

Dimercaprol is most effective when used within 1 or 2 hours after a poisoning. It may not be as effective in treating long-term poisoning.

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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