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Baygam

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Baygam

Baygam

WARNINGS

BayGam is made from human plasma. Products made from human plasma may contain infectious agents, such as viruses, that can cause disease. The risk that such products will transmit an infectious agent has been reduced by screening plasma donors for prior exposure to certain viruses, by testing for the presence of certain current virus infections, and by inactivating and/or removing certain viruses. Despite these measures, such products can still potentially transmit disease. There is also the possibility that unknown infectious agents may be present in such products. Individuals who receive infusions of blood or plasma products may develop signs and/or symptoms of some viral infections, particularly hepatitis C. ALL infections thought by a physician possibly to have been transmitted by this product should be reported by the physician or other healthcare provider to Bayer Corporation [1-888-765-3203].

The physician should discuss the risks and benefits of this product with the patient, before prescribing or administering it to the patient.

BayGam (immune globulin) should be given with caution to patients with a history of prior systemic allergic reactions following the administration of human immunoglobulin preparations.9

PRECAUTIONS

General

Immune Globulin (Human) should not be administered intravenously because of the potential for serious reactions. Injections should be made intramuscularly, and care should be taken to draw back on the plunger of the syringe before injection in order to be certain that the needle is not in a blood vessel.

Skin tests should not be done. In most human beings the intradermal injection of concentrated gamma globulin solution with its buffers causes a localized area of inflammation which can be misinterpreted as a positive allergic reaction. In actuality, this does not represent an allergy; rather, it is localized tissue irritation of a chemical nature. Misinterpretation of the results of such tests can lead the physician to withhold badly needed human immunoglobulin from a patient who is not actually allergic to this material. True allergic responses to human gamma globulin given in the prescribed intramuscular manner are rare.

Although systemic reactions to intramuscularly administered immunoglobulin preparations are rare, epinephrine should be available for treatment of acute allergic symptoms.

Clinical and Laboratory Tests

None required.

Pregnancy Category C

Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with BayGam (immune globulin) . It is also not known whether BayGam (immune globulin) can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman or can affect reproduction capacity. BayGam (immune globulin) should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.

Pediatric Use

Safety and effectiveness in the pediatric population have not been established.

REFERENCE

9. Fudenberg HH: Sensitization to immunoglobulins and hazards of gamma globulin therapy. In: Merler E (ed.): Immunoglobulins: biologic aspects and clinical uses. Washington DC, Nat Acad Sci, 1970, pp 211-20.

Last reviewed on RxList: 11/13/2008
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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