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Betaxolol Hydrochloride Ophthalmic

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Betaxolol Hydrochloride Ophthalmic

Betaxolol Hydrochloride Ophthalmic

Betaxolol Hydrochloride Ophthalmic Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using betaxolol ophthalmic (Betaxolol Hydrochloride Ophthalmic)?

Do not use this medication if you are allergic to betaxolol, or if you have:

  • asthma, or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD);
  • slow heartbeats; or
  • a heart condition called "AV block."

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medication:

  • breathing problems such as bronchitis or emphysema;
  • a history of heart disease or congestive heart failure;
  • diabetes;
  • history of stroke, blood clot, or circulation problems;
  • a thyroid disorder; or
  • a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether betaxolol ophthalmic is harmful to an unborn baby. Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether betaxolol passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use betaxolol ophthalmic (Betaxolol Hydrochloride Ophthalmic)?

Use betaxolol ophthalmic exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use the medication in larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the instructions on your prescription label.

Wash your hands before using the eye drops.

Do not use this medication while you are wearing contact lenses. Betaxolol ophthalmic may contain a preservative that can be absorbed by soft contact lenses. Wait at least 15 minutes after using betaxolol before putting your contact lenses in.

To apply the eye drops:

  • Tilt your head back slightly and pull down your lower eyelid. Hold the dropper above the eye with the dropper tip down. Look up and away from the dropper as you squeeze out a drop, then close your eye.
  • Gently press your finger to the inside corner of the eye (near your nose) for about 1 minute to keep the liquid from draining into your tear duct. If you use more than one drop in the same eye, wait about 5 minutes before putting in the next drop.
  • Do not allow the dropper tip to touch any surface, including the eyes or hands. If the dropper becomes contaminated it could cause an infection in your eye, which can lead to vision loss or serious damage to the eye.

Do not use the eye drops if the liquid has changed colors or has particles in it. Call your doctor for a new prescription.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any eye injury or infection. If you have any type of surgery, including eye surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using betaxolol ophthalmic. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Store this medication at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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