August 24, 2016

Burning Bush

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What other names is Burning Bush known by?

Adiptam, Burnet Saxifrage, Dictame Blanc, Dictame Fraxinelle, Dictamnus albus, Dictamnus caucasicus, Dictamnus fraxinellus, Dictamo Blanco, Díctamo Blanco, Dittany, Fraxinella, Fraxinelle, Gas Plant, Herba Dictamni Herba.

What is Burning Bush?

Burning bush is a plant. People use the leaves and roots to make medicine.

Burning bush is used for digestive tract disorders including cramps, stomach problems, and worms in the intestines. It is also used for urinary tract and genital tract disorders.

Women take burning bush to start menstruation, as birth control, and to help force out the placenta after childbirth.

Other uses include treating epilepsy, spasms, fluid retention, and baldness; liver disease (hepatitis); and use as a stimulant or tonic.

Some people apply burning bush directly to the affected area (topically) for treating skin disorders such as wounds, eczema, bacterial infection (impetigo), swelling (inflammation), and an infection (scabies) caused by tiny lice-like insects; as well as for painful conditions such as joint pain caused by arthritis or rheumatism. Other topical uses include treatment of fever; excessive uterine bleeding; use as a sedative for adults and children; and use as a tonic.

Don't confuse this plant with wahoo, which is also referred to as burning bush. One of the ways to tell the difference is that this burning bush has a distinctive lemon or cinnamon scent, and its oil burns easily.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...



TAKEN BY MOUTH
  • Digestive problems.
  • Urinary tract disorders.
  • Genital tract disorders.
  • Spasms.
  • Baldness.
  • Intestinal worms.
  • Liver disease (hepatitis).
  • Other conditions.
APPLIED TO THE SKIN
  • Arthritis.
  • Fever.
  • Skin disorders such as eczema, swelling (inflammation), impetigo, and scabies.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of burning bush for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).


Therapeutic Research Faculty copyright

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