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Bydureon

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Bydureon

Bydureon Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Bydureon

Generic Name: exenatide (Bydureon) (Pronunciation: ex EN a tide)

What is exenatide (Bydureon) (Bydureon)?

Exenatide is an injectable diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. This medication helps your pancreas produce insulin more efficiently. Bydureon is an extended-release form of exenatide.

Exenatide is used to treat type 2 diabetes. Other diabetes medicines are sometimes used in combination with exenatide if needed.

This medication guide provides information about the Bydureon brand of exenatide. Byetta is another brand of exenatide that is not covered in this medication guide.

Exenatide may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of Bydureon (Bydureon)?

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using this medication and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • swelling in your neck or throat (enlarged thyroid), hoarse voice, trouble swallowing or breathing;
  • swelling, weight gain, feeling short of breath, urinating less than usual or not at all;
  • drowsiness, confusion, mood changes, increased thirst, diarrhea;
  • dull pain in your middle or lower back;
  • severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, vomiting; or
  • low blood sugar (headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, confusion, irritability, dizziness, fast heart rate, or feeling jittery).

Less serious side effects may include:

  • nausea, upset stomach, diarrhea or constipation;
  • weight loss; or
  • itching or a hard lump where the medicine was injected.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Bydureon (exenatide) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

What is the most important information I should know about Bydureon (Bydureon)?

This medication guide provides information about the Bydureon brand of exenatide. Byetta is another brand of exenatide that is not covered in this medication guide.

You should not use Bydureon if you have a personal or family history of thyroid cancer, or if you have multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (cancer that can affect the thyroid, parathryoid, and adrenal glands).

Do not use exenatide to treat type 1 diabetes, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). You should not use exenatide if you have severe kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis), of if you have a severe stomach disorder that causes slow digestion.

In animal studies, Bydureon caused thyroid tumors. However, very high doses are used in animal studies. It is not known whether these effects would occur in people using doses recommended for human use. Ask your doctor about your personal risk.

You should not use Bydureon together with insulin. Do not use Bydureon together with Byetta.

Bydureon is an extended-release form of exenatide that can be given with or without food and given at any time of the day. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Stop using exenatide and call your doctor at once if you have severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, with nausea, vomiting, and a fast heart rate. These could be symptoms of pancreatitis.

Side Effects Centers
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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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