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Cardura XL

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Cardura XL

PATIENT INFORMATION

Patients should be told about the possible occurrence of symptoms related to postural hypotension, such as dizziness or syncope, when beginning therapy or when increasing dosage strength of CARDURA XL (doxazosin mesylate extended release tablets) . Patients should be cautioned about driving, operating machinery, or performing hazardous tasks during this period, until the drug's effect has been determined.

Patients should be informed that CARDURA XL (doxazosin mesylate extended release tablets) extended release tablets should be swallowed whole. Patients should not chew, divide, cut, or crush tablets. Patients should not be concerned if they occasionally notice in their stool something that looks like a tablet. In the CARDURA XL (doxazosin mesylate extended release tablets) extended release tablet, the medication is contained within a nonabsorbable shell designed to release the drug at a controlled rate. When this process is completed, the empty tablet is eliminated from the body.

CARDURA XL (doxazosin mesylate extended release tablets) should be taken each day with breakfast.

Last reviewed on RxList: 4/1/2010
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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Cardura XL - User Reviews

Cardura XL User Reviews

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