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Ceredase

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Ceredase

Ceredase Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Ceredase

Generic Name: alglucerase (Pronunciation: al GLOO ser ase)

What is alglucerase (Ceredase)?

Alglucerase is a man-made form of an enzyme that occurs naturally in the body. It is used as an enzyme replacement in people with Type I Gaucher disease.

Gaucher disease is a genetic condition in which the body lacks the enzyme needed to break down certain fatty materials (lipids). Lipids can build up in the body, causing symptoms such as easy bruising or bleeding, weakness, anemia, bone or joint pain, enlarged liver or spleen, or weakened bones that are easily fractured.

Alglucerase may improve the condition of the liver, spleen, bones, and blood cells in people with Type I Gaucher disease. However, alglucerase is not a cure for this condition.

Alglucerase may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of alglucerase (Ceredase)?

Some people receiving an alglucerase injection have had a reaction to the infusion (when the medicine is injected into the vein). Tell your caregiver right away if you feel itchy, dizzy, light-headed, or have hives, stomach cramps, pain or tightness in your chest, trouble breathing, or swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

It may still be possible for you to receive alglucerase after you have had a reaction to it. There are other medications that can be given to you before your alglucerase infusion to help prevent any reaction symptoms.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • mouth sores;
  • warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin;
  • easy bruising or bleeding;
  • extreme weakness or tired feeling;
  • swollen belly, stomach discomfort; or
  • pale skin.

Some of these may be symptoms of your condition and not actual side effects of alglucerase.

Less serious side effects may include:

  • hot flashes;
  • changes in your menstrual periods;
  • headache;
  • back pain;
  • swelling in your hands or feet;
  • changes in your sense of smell;
  • nausea, diarrhea, upset stomach;
  • fever or chills; or
  • any burning, itching, or swelling around the IV needle when the medicine is injected.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the Ceredase (alglucerase injection) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

What is the most important information I should know about alglucerase (Ceredase)?

Alglucerase may improve the condition of the liver, spleen, bones, and blood cells in people with Type I Gaucher disease. However, alglucerase is not a cure for this condition.

Some people receiving an alglucerase injection have had a reaction to the infusion (when the medicine is injected into the vein). Tell your caregiver right away if you feel itchy, dizzy, light-headed, or have hives, stomach cramps, pain or tightness in your chest, trouble breathing, or swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

It may still be possible for you to receive alglucerase even after you have had a reaction to it. There are other medications that can be given to you before your alglucerase infusion to help prevent any reaction symptoms.

Side Effects Centers
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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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