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Cerezyme

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Cerezyme

Cerezyme Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my health care provider before using imiglucerase (Cerezyme)?

Before using imiglucerase, tell your doctor if you have

  • had an allergic reaction to imiglucerase, alglucerase (Ceredase), or have antibodies to either medication; or
  • breathing problems or pulmonary hypertension.

You may not be able to use imiglucerase, or you may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment.

Imiglucerase is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether it will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not use imiglucerase without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether imiglucerase passes into breast milk. Do not use imiglucerase without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use imiglucerase (Cerezyme)?

Use imiglucerase exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.

Imiglucerase is given by intravenous (into the vein) injection and will most likely be administered by a healthcare provider.

Your doctor may want you to have blood tests or other medical evaluations during treatment with imiglucerase to monitor progress and side effects.

Your healthcare provider will store imiglucerase as instructed by the manufacturer. If you are storing imiglucerase at home, your healthcare provider will give you instructions regarding how to store the medication.

Side Effects Centers
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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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