November 29, 2015
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Cipro IV

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Cipro I.V.

Side Effects


The following serious and otherwise important adverse drug reactions are discussed in greater detail in other sections of labeling:

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Adult Patients

During clinical investigations with oral and parenteral CIPRO IV, 49,038 patients received courses of the drug.

The most frequently reported adverse reactions, from clinical trials of all formulations, all dosages, all drug-therapy durations, and for all indications of ciprofloxacin therapy were nausea (2.5%), diarrhea (1.6%), liver function tests abnormal (1.3%), vomiting (1%), and rash (1%).

In clinical trials the following adverse reactions were reported in greater than 1% of patients treated with intravenous CIPRO IV: nausea, diarrhea, central nervous system disturbance, local intravenous site reactions, liver function tests abnormal, eosinophilia, headache, restlessness, and rash. Local intravenous site reactions are more frequent if the infusion time is 30 minutes or less. These may appear as local skin reactions that resolve rapidly upon completion of the infusion. Subsequent intravenous administration is not contraindicated unless the reactions recur or worsen.

Table 5: Medically Important Adverse Reactions That Occurred in less than 1% Ciprofloxacin Patients

System Organ Class Adverse Reactions
Body as a Whole Abdominal Pain/Discomfort Pain
Cardiovascular Cardiopulmonary Arrest
Myocardial Infarction
Angina Pectoris
Central Nervous System Restlessness
Seizures (including Status Epilepticus)
Paranoia Psychosis (toxic)
Depression (potentially culminating in self-injurious behavior, such as suicidal ideations/thoughts and attempted or completed suicide)
Manic Reaction
Abnormal Gait
Gastrointestinal Ileus
Gastrointestinal Bleeding
Intestinal Perforation
Oral Ulceration
Mouth Dryness
Hemic/Lymphatic Agranulocytosis
Prolongation of Prothrombin Time
Metabolic/Nutritional Hyperglycemia
Musculoskeletal Arthralgia
Joint Stiffness
Muscle Weakness
Ren al/U rogenital Renal Failure
Interstitial Nephritis
Renal Calculi
Frequent Urination
Respiratory Respiratory Arrest
Skin/Hypersensitivity Allergic Reactions
Anaphylactic Reactions including life-threatening anaphylactic shock
Multiforme/Stevens-Johnson Syndrome
Exfoliative Dermatitis
Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis
Increased Perspiration
Photosensitivity/Phototoxicity Reaction
Special Senses Decreased Visual Acuity
Blurred Vision
Disturbed Vision (diplopia, chromatopsia, and photopsia)
Hearing Loss
Bad Taste

In several instances, nausea, vomiting, tremor, irritability, or palpitation were judged by investigators to be related to elevated serum levels of theophylline possibly as a result of drug interaction with ciprofloxacin.

In randomized, double-blind controlled clinical trials comparing CIPRO (Intravenous and Intravenous/Oral. sequential) with intravenous beta-lactam control antibiotics, the CNS adverse reaction profile of CIPRO was comparable to that of the control drugs.

Pediatric Patients

Short (6 weeks) and long term (1 year) musculoskeletal and neurological safety of oral/intravenous ciprofloxacin was compared to a cephalosporin for treatment of cUTI or pyelonephritis in pediatric patients 1 to 17 years of age (mean age of 6 ± 4 years) in an international multicenter trial. The duration of therapy was 10 to 21 days (mean duration of treatment was 11 days with a range of 1 to 88 days). A total of 335 ciprofloxacin-and 349 comparator-treated patients were enrolled.

An Independent Pediatric Safety Committee (IPSC) reviewed all cases of musculoskeletal adverse reactions including abnormal gait or abnormal joint exam (baseline or treatment-emergent). Within 6 weeks of treatment initiation, the rates of musculoskeletal adverse reactions were 9.3% (31/335) in the ciprofloxacin-treated group versus 6% (21/349) in comparator-treated patients. All musculoskeletal adverse reactions occurring by 6 weeks resolved (clinical resolution of signs and symptoms), usually within 30 days of end of treatment. Radiological evaluations were not routinely used to confirm resolution of the adverse reactions. Ciprofloxacin-treated patients were more likely to report more than one adverse reaction and on more than one occasion compared to control patients. The rate of musculoskeletal adverse reactions was consistently higher in the ciprofloxacin group compared to the control group across all age subgroups. At the end of 1 year, the rate of these adverse reactions reported at any time during that period was 13.7% (46/335) in the ciprofloxacin-treated group versus 9.5% (33/349) in the comparator-treated patients (Table 6).

Table 6: Musculoskeletal Adverse Reactions1 as Assessed by the IPSC

  CIPRO Comparator
All Patients (within 6 weeks) 31/335 (9.3%) 21/349 (6%)
95% Confidence Interval2
(-0.8%, +7.2%)
Age Group
12 months to 24 months 1/36 (2.8%) 0/41
2 years to < 6 years 5/124 (4%) 3/118 (2.5%)
6 years to < 12 years 18/143 (12.6%) 12/153 (7.8%)
12 years to 17 years 7/32 (21.9%) 6/37 (16.2 %)
All Patients (within 1 year) 46/335 (13.7%) 33/349 (9.5%)
95% Confidence Interval2
(-0.6%, + 9.1%)
1Included: arthralgia, abnormal gait, abnormal joint exam, joint sprains, leg pain, back pain, arthrosis, bone pain, pain, myalgia, arm pain, and decreased range of motion in a joint (knee, elbow, ankle, hip, wrist, and shoulder)
2The study was designed to demonstrate that the arthropathy rate for the CIPRO group did not exceed that of the control group by more than + 6%. At both the 6 week and 1 year evaluations, the 95% confidence interval indicated that it could not be concluded that the ciprofloxacin group had findings comparable to the control group.

The incidence rates of neurological adverse reactions within 6 weeks of treatment initiation were 3% (9/335) in the ciprofloxacin group versus 2% (7/349) in the comparator group and included dizziness, nervousness, insomnia, and somnolence.

In this trial, the overall incidence rates of adverse reactions within 6 weeks of treatment initiation were 41% (138/335) in the ciprofloxacin group versus 31% (109/349) in the comparator group. The most frequent adverse reactions were gastrointestinal: 15% (50/335) of ciprofloxacin patients compared to 9% (31/349) of comparator patients. Serious adverse reactions were seen in 7.5% (25/335) of ciprofloxacintreated patients compared to 5.7% (20/349) of control patients. Discontinuation of drug due to an adverse reaction was observed in 3% (10/335) of ciprofloxacin-treated patients versus 1.4% (5/349) of comparator patients. Other adverse events that occurred in at least 1% of ciprofloxacin patients were diarrhea 4.8%, vomiting 4.8%, abdominal pain 3.3%, dyspepsia 2.7%, nausea 2.7%, fever 2.1%, asthma 1.8% and rash 1.8%.

Short-term safety data for ciprofloxacin was also collected in a randomized, double-blind clinical trial for the treatment of acute pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis patients (ages 5–17 years). Sixty seven patients received CIPRO IV 10 mg/kg/dose every 8 hours for one week followed by CIPRO tablets 20 mg/kg/dose every 12 hours to complete 10–21 days treatment and 62 patients received the combination of ceftazidime intravenous 50 mg/kg/dose every 8 hours and tobramycin intravenous 3 mg/kg/dose every 8 hours for a total of 10–21 days. Periodic musculoskeletal assessments were conducted by treatment-blinded examiners. Patients were followed for an average of 23 days after completing treatment (range 0– 93 days). Musculoskeletal adverse reactions were reported in 22% of the patients in the ciprofloxacin group and 21% in the comparison group. Decreased range of motion was reported in 12% of the subjects in the ciprofloxacin group and 16% in the comparison group. Arthralgia was reported in 10% of the patients in the ciprofloxacin group and 11% in the comparison group. Other adverse reactions were similar in nature and frequency between treatment arms. The efficacy of CIPRO for the treatment of acute pulmonary exacerbations in pediatric cystic fibrosis patients has not been established.

In addition to the adverse reactions reported in pediatric patients in clinical trials, it should be expected that adverse reactions reported in adults during clinical trials or postmarketing experience may also occur in pediatric patients.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been reported from worldwide marketing experience with fluoroquinolones, including CIPRO IV. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure (Table 7).

Table 7: Postmarketing Reports of Adverse Drug Reactions

System Organ Class Adverse Reactions
Cardiovascular QT prolongation
Torsade de Pointes
Vasculitis and ventricular arrhythmia
Central Nervous System Hypertonia
Exacerbation of myasthenia gravis
Peripheral neuropathy
Eye Disorders Nystagmus
Gastrointestinal Pseudomembranous colitis
Hemic/Lymphatic Pancytopenia (life threatening or fatal outcome)
Hepatobiliary Hepatic failure (including fatal cases)
Infections and Infestations Candidiasis (oral, gastrointestinal, vaginal)
Investigations Prothrombin time prolongation or decrease
Cholesterol elevation (serum)
Potassium elevation (serum)
Musculoskeletal Myalgia
Tendon rupture
Psychiatric Disorders Agitation
Skin/Hypersensitivity Acute generalize exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP)
Fixed eruption Serum sickness-like reaction
Special Senses Anosmia
Taste loss

Adverse Laboratory Changes

Changes in laboratory parameters while on CIPRO IV therapy are listed below:

Other changes occurring were: decreased leukocyte count, elevated atypical lymphocyte count, immature WBCs, elevated serum calcium, elevation of serum gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gGT), decreased BUN, decreased uric acid, decreased total serum protein, decreased serum albumin, decreased serum potassium, elevated serum potassium, elevated serum cholesterol. Other changes occurring during administration of ciprofloxacin were: elevation of serum amylase, decrease of blood glucose, pancytopenia, leukocytosis, elevated sedimentation rate, change in serum phenytoin, decreased prothrombin time, hemolytic anemia, and bleeding diathesis.

Read the Cipro I.V. (ciprofloxacin iv) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects


Ciprofloxacin is an inhibitor of human cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) mediated metabolism. Coadministration of CIPRO IV with other drugs primarily metabolized by CYP1A2 results in increased plasma concentrations of these drugs and could lead to clinically significant adverse events of the coadministered drug.

Table 8: Drugs That are Affected by and Affecting CIPRO IV

Drugs That are Affected by CIPRO IV
Drug(s) Recommendation Comments
Tizanidine Contraindicated Concomitant administration of tizanidine and CIPRO IV is contraindicated due to the potentiation of hypotensive and sedative effects of tizanidine [see CONTRAINDICATIONS]
Theophylline Avoid Use (Plasma Exposure Likely to be Increased and Prolonged) Concurrent administration of CIPRO IV with theophylline may result in increased risk of a patient developing central nervous system (CNS) or other adverse reactions. If concomitant use cannot be avoided, monitor serum levels of theophylline and adjust dosage as appropriate. [See WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS.]
Drugs Known to Prolong QT Interval Avoid Use CIPRO IV may further prolong the QT interval in patients receiving drugs known to prolong the QT interval (for example, class IA or III antiarrhythmics, tricyclic antidepressants, macrolides, antipsychotics) [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS and Use in Specific Populations].
Oral antidiabetic drugs Use with caution Glucose-lowering effect potentiated Hypoglycemia sometimes severe has been reported when CIPRO IV and oral antidiabetic agents, mainly sulfonylureas (for example, glyburide, glimepiride), were co-administered, presumably by intensifying the action of the oral antidiabetic agent. Fatalities have been reported. Monitor blood glucose when ciprofloxacin is co-administered with oral antidiabetic drugs. [See ADVERSE REACTIONS]
Phenytoin Use with caution Altered serum levels of phenytoin (increased and decreased) To avoid the loss of seizure control associated with decreased phenytoin levels and to prevent phenytoin overdose-related adverse reactions upon CIPRO IV discontinuation in patients receiving both agents, monitor phenytoin therapy, including phenytoin serum concentration during and shortly after co-administration of CIPRO IV with phenytoin.
Cyclosporine Use with caution (transient elevations in serum creatinine) Monitor renal function (in particular serum creatinine) when ciprofloxacin is co-administered with cyclosporine.
Anti-coagulant drugs Use with caution (Increase in anticoagulant effect) The risk may vary with the underlying infection, age and general status of the patient so that the contribution of CIPRO IV to the increase in INR (international normalized ratio) is difficult to assess. Monitor prothrombin time and INR frequently during and shortly after co-administration of CIPRO IV with an oral anticoagulant (for example, warfarin).
Methotrexate Use with caution Inhibition of methotrexate renal tubular transport potentially leading to increased methotrexate plasma levels Potential increase in the risk of methotrexate associated toxic reactions. Therefore, carefully monitor patients under methotrexate therapy when concomitant CIPRO IV therapy is indicated.
Ropinirole Use with caution Monitoring for ropinirole-related adverse reactions and appropriate dose adjustment of ropinirole is recommended during and shortly after co-administration with CIPRO IV [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].
Clozapine Use with caution Careful monitoring of clozapine associated adverse reactions and appropriate adjustment of clozapine dosage during and shortly after co-administration with CIPRO IV are advised.
NSAIDs Use with caution Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (but not acetyl salicylic acid) in combination of very high doses of quinolones have been shown to provoke convulsions in pre-clinical studies and in postmarketing.
Sildenafil Use with caution Two-fold increase in exposure Monitor for sildenafil toxicity (see Pharmacokinetics).
Duloxetine Avoid Use Five-fold increase in duloxetine exposure If unavoidable, monitor for duloxetine toxicity
Caffeine/Xanthine Derivatives Use with caution Reduced clearance resulting in elevated levels and prolongation of serum half-life CIPRO IV inhibits the formation of paraxanthine after caffeine administration (or pentoxifylline containing products). Monitor for xanthine toxicity and adjust dose as necessary.
Drug(s) Affecting Pharmacokinetics of CIPRO
Probenecid Use with caution (interferes with renal tubular secretion of CIPRO and increases CIPRO serum levels) Potentiation of CIPRO IV toxicity may occur.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Last reviewed on RxList: 4/13/2015

Side Effects

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