July 25, 2016

Coenzyme Q-10

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How does Coenzyme Q-10 work?

Coenzyme Q-10 is an important vitamin-like substance required for the proper function of many organs and chemical reactions in the body. It helps provide energy to cells. Coenzyme Q-10 also seems to have antioxidant activity. People with certain diseases, such as congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, periodontal disease, Parkinson's disease, certain muscular diseases, and AIDS, might have lower levels of coenzyme Q-10.

Are there safety concerns?

Coenzyme Q-10 is LIKELY SAFE for most adults when taken by mouth or when applied directly to the gums. While most people tolerate coenzyme Q-10 well, it can cause some mild side effects including stomach upset, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. It can cause allergic skin rashes in some people. It also might lower blood pressure, so check your blood pressure carefully if you have very low blood pressure. Dividing the total daily dose by taking smaller amounts two or three times a day instead of a large amount all at once can help reduce side effects.

Coenzyme Q-10 is POSSIBLY SAFE for children when taken by mouth. However, coenzyme Q-10 should not be used in children without medical supervision.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Coenzyme Q-10 is POSSIBLY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately during preganancy. Coenzyme Q-10 has been used safely twice daily starting at 20 weeks until delivery. Not enough is known about the use of coenzyme Q-10 during breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Chemotherapy: There is some concern that coenzyme Q-10 might lower the effectiveness of some chemotherapy drugs. People undergoing chemotherapy with certain drugs should use coenzyme Q-10 with caution.

High blood pressure or low blood pressure: Coenzyme Q-10 might lower blood pressure. It can increase the effects of medications used to lower blood pressure. Discuss your use of coenzyme Q-10 with your healthcare provider if you have blood pressure problems.

Smoking: Cigarette smoking depletes the amount of coenzyme Q-10 stored by the body.

Surgery: Coenzyme Q-10 might interfere with blood pressure control during and after surgery. Stop using coenzyme Q-10 at least two weeks before a scheduled surgery.


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