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Your Guide to Birth Control: Condoms

Introduction to Male Condoms

Birth control is a way for men and women to prevent pregnancy. There are many different methods of birth control; some types also protect against sexually transmitted diseases. Condoms are one type of birth control that in addition to preventing pregnancy also prevent the spread of STDs.

There are two types of condoms, the male condom and the female condom.

What Is a Male Condom?

The male condom, or "rubber," is a thin covering made of latex, plastic, or animal membrane that is rolled over an erect penis. The covering prevents semen, the fluid that contains sperm, from entering a woman's vagina.

What Are Male Condoms Made of?

Most condoms are made of a type of rubber called "latex." Latex condoms are the most effective condom at preventing STDs. Recently, condoms made of polyurethane (a type of plastic) have become available. These are more expensive than latex condoms and seem to break more easily. They are mainly useful for people who are allergic to latex. There are also "natural" condoms, which are made of animal membranes (lambskin). These are expensive and although they are effective at preventing pregnancy they do not decrease the spread of many sexually transmitted diseases.

What Types of Latex Condoms Are There?

Condoms come in all shapes, sizes, and materials. Here are some characteristics to consider when buying condoms.

  • Size. The standard size will fit most men. Extra-large condoms are available, as well as "snug" sizes that are a little smaller and fit tighter than the standard size.
  • Shape. Some condoms come with a nipple in the end to hold the fluid when the man ejaculates. Others have a rounded end.
  • Thickness. Extra-strength condoms are available. These are stronger and are especially useful for rectal sex and for men who have problems with condom breakage. Extra thin condoms also are available, but these are not recommended because they may break more easily.
  • Lubrication. Many condoms come pre-lubricated. This lubrication can be a substance that kills sperm (spermicide) and many disease-causing germs. Lubrication may give some extra protection in preventing pregnancy, especially if the condom breaks. Lubricated condoms taste bad and are not recommended for oral sex.
  • Flavored. These condoms are meant for the male to wear when receiving oral sex. They are not lubricated and have a mild flavor (usually mint).
  • Color. Condoms come in many colors. The color of the condom doesn't make it any more or less effective.

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Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/condoms/article.htm

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