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Cortone

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Cortone

Discontinued Warning IconPlease Note: This Brand Name drug is no longer available in the US.
(Generic versions may still be available.)

Cortone Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking cortisone (Cortone)?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to cortisone, or if you have a fungal infection anywhere in your body.

Steroid medication can weaken your immune system, making it easier for you to get an infection. Steroids can also worsen an infection you already have, or reactivate an infection you recently had. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

To make sure you can safely take cortisone, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • liver disease (such as cirrhosis);
  • kidney disease;
  • a thyroid disorder;
  • diabetes;
  • a history of malaria;
  • tuberculosis;
  • osteoporosis;
  • a muscle disorder such as myasthenia gravis;
  • glaucoma or cataracts;
  • herpes infection of the eyes;
  • stomach ulcers, ulcerative colitis, or diverticulitis;
  • depression or mental illness;
  • congestive heart failure; or
  • high blood pressure.

It is not known whether cortisone will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

Cortisone can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using cortisone.

Steroids can affect growth in children. Talk with your doctor if you think your child is not growing at a normal rate while using this medication.

How should I take cortisone (Cortone)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Your dosage needs may change if you have surgery, are ill, are under stress, or have a fever or infection. Do not change your medication dose or schedule without your doctor's advice. Tell your doctor about any illness or infection you have had within the past several weeks.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using cortisone.

Do not stop using cortisone suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Talk to your doctor about how to avoid withdrawal symptoms when stopping the medication.

Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you take cortisone. Any medical care provider who treats you should know that you take steroid medication.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Side Effects Centers
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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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