July 24, 2016

Cowslip

font size


What other names is Cowslip known by?

Artetyke, Arthritica, Buckels, Butter Rose, Coqueluchon, Coucou, Crewel, Drelip, English Cowslip, Fairy Caps, Herb Perter, Herbe de Saint Paul, Key Flower, Key of Heaven, Mayflower, Our Lady's Keys, Paigle, Paigle Peggle, Palsywort, Password, Peagle, Peagles, Petty Mulleins, Plumrocks, Primerolle, Primevère, Primevère de Printemps, Primevère Officinale, Primevère Vraie, Primrose, Primula, Primula elatior, Primula officinalis, Primula veris, Printanière.

What is Cowslip?

Cowslip is a plant. The flower and root are used to make medicine.

Cowslip flower is used for swollen nose and throat, cough, bronchitis, trouble sleeping (insomnia), headache, hysteria, nerve pain (neuralgia), and tremors. It is also used to increase urine production, to reduce muscle spasms, as a "heart tonic" for sensations of dizziness and "weak heart," and to treat heart failure, whooping cough, asthma, gout, and nervous system complaints.

In combination with gentian root, European elder flower, verbena, and sorrel, cowslip is used for maintaining healthy sinuses and treating swollen and painful sinuses (sinusitis).

Possibly Effective for...

  • Inflamed nasal passages or sinusitis. Some research suggests that taking a specific combination of cowslip, gentian root, European elder flower, verbena, and sorrel (SinuComp by Sinupret) improves symptoms of sinusitis.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Bronchitis. Developing research suggests taking cowslip root in combination with thyme (Bronchipret) by mouth relieves symptoms of bronchitis such as coughing, fever, and increased production of mucus.
  • Cough.
  • Whooping cough.
  • Insomnia.
  • Nervous excitability.
  • Headache.
  • Hysteria.
  • Nerve pain.
  • Tremors.
  • Fluid retention.
  • Spasms.
  • Asthma.
  • Gout.
  • Nervous system complaints.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of cowslip for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).


Therapeutic Research Faculty copyright

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Allergies & Asthma

Improve treatments & prevent attacks.

Health Resources
Related Supplements
advertisement
advertisement
Use Pill Finder Find it Now See Interactions

Pill Identifier on RxList

  • quick, easy,
    pill identification

Find a Local Pharmacy

  • including 24 hour, pharmacies

Interaction Checker

  • Check potential drug interactions
Search the Medical Dictionary for Health Definitions & Medical Abbreviations