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Cutivate

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Cutivate Cream

Cutivate Cream

WARNINGS

No information provided.

PRECAUTIONS

CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream contains the excipient imidurea which releases formaldehyde as a breakdown product. Formaldehyde may cause allergic sensitization or irritation upon contact with the skin. CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream should not be used in individuals with hypersensitivity to formaldehyde as it may prevent healing or worsen dermatitis.

General

Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids can produce reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression with the potential for glucocorticosteroid insufficiency after withdrawal from treatment. Manifestations of Cushing syndrome, hyperglycemia, and glucosuria can also be produced in some patients by systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids while on treatment.

Patients applying a potent topical steroid to a large surface area or to areas under occlusion should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression. This may be done by using the ACTH stimulation, A.M. plasma cortisol, and urinary free cortisol tests.

If HPA axis suppression is noted, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, or to substitute a less potent steroid. Recovery of HPA axis function is generally prompt upon discontinuation of topical corticosteroids. Infrequently, signs and symptoms of glucocorticosteroid insufficiency may occur requiring supplemental systemic corticosteroids. For information on systemic supplementation, see prescribing information for those products.

CUTIVATE Cream (fluticasone propionate cream) , 0.05% caused depression of A.M. plasma cortisol levels in 1 of 6 adult patients when used daily for 7 days in patients with psoriasis or eczema involving at least 30% of the body surface. After 2 days of treatment, this patient developed a 60% decrease from pretreatment values in the A.M. plasma cortisol level.

There was some evidence of corresponding decrease in the 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels. The A.M. plasma cortisol level remained slightly depressed for 48 hours but recovered by day 6 of treatment.

CUTIVATE Cream (fluticasone propionate cream) , 0.05%, caused HPA axis suppression in 2 of 43 pediatric patients, ages 2 and 5 years old, who were treated for 4 weeks covering at least 35% of the body surface area. Follow-up testing 12 days after treatment discontinuation, available for 1 of the 2 subjects, demonstrated a normally responsive HPA axis (see PRECAUTIONS: Pediatric Use).

Pediatric patients may be more susceptible to systemic toxicity from equivalent doses due to their larger skin surface to body mass ratios (see PRECAUTIONS: Pediatric Use).

The following local adverse reactions have been reported with topical corticosteroids, and they may occur more frequently with the use of occlusive dressings and higher potency corticosteroids. These reactions are listed in an approximately decreasing order of occurrence: irritation, folliculitis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, secondary infection, skin atrophy, striae, hypertrichosis, and miliaria.

CUTIVATE Cream (fluticasone propionate cream) , 0.05% may cause local cutaneous adverse reactions (see ADVERSE REACTIONS).

If irritation develops, CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. Allergic contact dermatitis with corticosteroids is usually diagnosed by observing failure to heal rather than noting a clinical exacerbation as with most topical products not containing corticosteroids. Such an observation should be corroborated with appropriate diagnostic patch testing.

If concomitant skin infections are present or develop, an appropriate antifungal or antibacterial agent should be used. If a favorable response does not occur promptly, use of CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream should be discontinued until the infection has been adequately controlled.

CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream should not be used in the presence of preexisting skin atrophy and should not be used where infection is present at the treatment site. CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream should not be used in the treatment of rosacea and perioral dermatitis.

Laboratory Tests

The following tests may be helpful in evaluating patients for HPA axis suppression:

ACTH stimulation test
A.M. plasma cortisol test
Urinary free cortisol test

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, and Impairment of Fertility

Two 18-month studies were performed in mice to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of fluticasone propionate when given topically (as an 0.05% ointment) and orally. No evidence of carcinogenicity was found in either study.

Fluticasone propionate was not mutagenic in the standard Ames test, E. coli fluctuation test, S. cerevisiae gene conversion test, or Chinese Hamster ovarian cell assay. It was not clastogenic in mouse micronucleus or cultured human lymphocyte tests.

In a fertility and general reproductive performance study in rats, fluticasone propionate administered subcutaneously to females at up to 50 mcg/kg per day and to males at up to 100 mcg/kg per day (later reduced to 50 mcg/kg per day) had no effect upon mating performance or fertility. These doses are approximately 15 and 30 times, respectively, the human systemic exposure following use of the recommended human topical dose of fluticasone propionate cream, 0.05%, assuming human percutaneous absorption of approximately 3% and the use in a 70-kg person of 15 g/day.

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects - Pregnancy Category C

Corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic in laboratory animals when administered systemically at relatively low dosage levels. Some corticosteroids have been shown to be teratogenic after dermal application in laboratory animals. Teratology studies in the mouse demonstrated fluticasone propionate to be teratogenic (cleft palate) when administered subcutaneously in doses of 45 mcg/kg/day and 150 mcg/kg/day. This dose is approximately 14 and 45 times, respectively, the human topical dose of fluticasone propionate cream, 0.05%. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Nursing Mothers

Systemically administered corticosteroids appear in human milk and could suppress growth, interfere with endogenous corticosteroid production, or cause other untoward effects. It is not known whether topical administration of corticosteroids could result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream is administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use

CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream contains the excipient imidurea which releases formaldehyde as a breakdown product. Formaldehyde may cause allergic sensitization or irritation upon contact with the skin. CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Lotion should not be used in individuals with hypersensitivity to formaldehyde as it may prevent healing or worsen dermatitis.

CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream should be discontinued if control is achieved before 4 weeks. If no improvement is seen within 2 weeks, contact a physician. The safety and efficacy of drug use for longer than 4 weeks in this population have not been established.

The safety and efficacy of CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream in pediatric patients below 3 months of age have not been established.

Parents of pediatric patients should be advised not to use this medication in the treatment of diaper dermatitis unless directed by the physician. CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Lotion should not be applied in the diaper areas as diapers or plastic pants may constitute occlusive dressing.

CUTIVATE Cream (fluticasone propionate cream) , 0.05%, caused HPA axis suppression in 2 of 43 pediatric patients, ages 2 and 5 years old, who were treated for 4 weeks covering at least 35% of the body surface area. Follow-up testing 12 days after treatment discontinuation, available for 1 of the 2 subjects, demonstrated a normally responsive HPA axis (see ADVERSE REACTIONS). Adverse effects including striae have been reported with use of topical corticosteroids in pediatric patients.

HPA axis suppression, Cushing syndrome, linear growth retardation, delayed weight gain, and intracranial hypertension have been reported in pediatric patients receiving topical corticosteroids. Manifestations of adrenal suppression in pediatric patients include low plasma cortisol levels to an absence of response to ACTH stimulation. Manifestations of intracranial hypertension include bulging fontanelles, headaches, and bilateral papilledema. Administration of topical corticosteroids to children should be limited to the least amount compatible with an effective therapeutic regimen. Chronic corticosteroid therapy may interfere with the growth and development of children.

Geriatric Use

A limited number of patients above 65 years of age (n = 126) have been treated with CUTIVATE® (fluticasone propionate cream) Cream in US and non-US clinical trials. While the number of patients is too small to permit separate analysis of efficacy and safety, the adverse reactions reported in this population were similar to those reported by younger patients. Based on available data, no adjustment of dosage of CUTIVATE® in geriatric patients is warranted.

Last reviewed on RxList: 9/23/2010
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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