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Danocrine

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Danocrine

Danocrine

Danocrine Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking danazol (Danocrine)?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to danazol, or if you have:

  • severe heart disease;
  • severe kidney disease;
  • severe liver disease;
  • porphyria;
  • abnormal vaginal bleeding that has not been checked by a doctor;
  • if you are pregnant or breast-feeding a baby.

Before taking danazol, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • a history of stroke or blood clot;
  • high cholesterol or triglycerides, coronary artery disease;
  • breast cancer;
  • a seizure disorder;
  • heart disease, congestive heart failure;
  • kidney or liver disease; or
  • migraine headaches.

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take danazol.

FDA pregnancy category X. This medication can cause birth defects. Do not use danazol if you are pregnant. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment.

Before you start taking danazol, you may need to have a pregnancy test to make sure you are not pregnant.

Use an effective barrier form of birth control (such as a condom or diaphragm with spermicide gel or inserts). Hormonal forms of contraception (such as birth control pills, injections, implants, skin patches, and vaginal rings) may not be effective enough to prevent pregnancy during your treatment.

Taking danazol to treat endometriosis may increase your risk of ovarian cancer. Talk with your doctor about your individual risk.

How should I take danazol (Danocrine)?

Take this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not take the medication in larger amounts, or take it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Women who take danazol may need to start the medication during a menstrual period. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from this medication.

Your medication needs may change if you have unusual stress such as a serious illness, fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency. Tell your doctor about any such situation that affects you.

This medication can cause you to have unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using danazol.

It may take several weeks of using this medicine before your symptoms improve. For best results, keep using the medication as directed. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Talk with your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 2 months of taking danazol, or if you continue to have attacks of angioedema.

Store danazol at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Side Effects Centers
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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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