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Danocrine

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Danocrine

Danocrine Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking danazol (Danocrine)?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to danazol, or if you have:

  • severe heart disease, a history of stroke or blood clot;
  • severe kidney disease;
  • severe liver disease;
  • a hormone-related cancer such as breast or uterine cancer;
  • porphyria (a genetic enzyme disorder that causes symptoms affecting the skin or nervous system);
  • abnormal vaginal bleeding that has not been checked by a doctor; or
  • if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

To make sure you can safely take danazol, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • heart disease, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure;
  • high cholesterol or triglycerides;
  • a history of breast cancer;
  • diabetes;
  • hypoparathyroidism, or low levels of calcium in your blood;
  • a seizure disorder;
  • kidney or liver disease; or
  • migraine headaches.

FDA pregnancy category X. This medication can harm an unborn baby or cause vaginal birth defects in a newborn female infant. Do not use danazol if you are pregnant. Stop taking danazol and tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant during treatment.

You may need to have a negative pregnancy test before starting this treatment.

Use a barrier form of birth control (such as a condom or diaphragm with spermicide). Hormonal contraception (such as birth control pills, injections, implants, skin patches, and vaginal rings) may not be effective enough to prevent pregnancy during your treatment with danazol.

Danazol can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using danazol.

Taking danazol to treat endometriosis may increase your risk of ovarian cancer. Talk with your doctor about your individual risk.

How should I take danazol (Danocrine)?

Take exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Women who take danazol to treat endometriosis or fibrocystic breast disease should start the medication during a menstrual period.

Danazol is usually given for 6 to 9 months to treat fibrocystic breast disease or endometriosis. To prevent attacks of hereditary angioedema, you may need to use the medication long-term. Follow your doctor's instructions.

Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results.

Your medication needs may change if you become ill, have a fever or infection, or if you have surgery or a medical emergency. Tell your doctor about any such situation that affects you. Do not change your medication dose or schedule without your doctor's advice.

Use danazol regularly to get the most benefit. Try not to miss any doses. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

While using danazol, you may need blood tests at your doctor's office. Visit your doctor regularly.

It may take several weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or if they get worse during treatment.

This medication can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using danazol.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

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Danazol - User Reviews

Danazol User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Danazol sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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