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Diabeta

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DiaBeta

SIDE EFFECTS

Hypoglycemia

See PRECAUTIONS and OVERDOSAGE Sections.

Gastrointestinal Reactions

Cholestatic jaundice and hepatitis may occur rarely which may progress to liver failure; Diaβeta should be discontinued if this occurs. Liver function abnormalities, including isolated transaminase elevations, have been reported. Gastrointestinal disturbances, e.g., nausea, epigastric fullness, and heartburn, are the most common reactions and occur in 1.8% of treated patients. They tend to be dose-related and may disappear when dosage is reduced.

Dermatologic Reactions

Allergic skin reactions, e.g., pruritus, erythema, urticaria, and morbilliform or maculopapular eruptions, occur in 1.5% of treated patients. These may be transient and may disappear despite continued use of Diaβeta; if skin reactions persist, the drug should be discontinued.

Porphyria cutanea tarda and photosensitivity reactions have been reported with sulfonylureas.

Hematologic Reactions

Leukopenia, agranulocytosis, thrombocytopenia, which occasionally may present as purpura, hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, and pancytopenia have been reported with sulfonylureas.

Metabolic Reactions

Hepatic porphyria reactions have been reported with sulfonylureas; however, these have not been reported with Diaβeta. Disulfiram-like reactions have been reported very rarely with Diaβeta. Cases of hyponatremia have been reported with glyburide and all other sulfonylureas, most often in patients who are on other medications or have medical conditions known to cause hyponatremia or increase release of antidiuretic hormone. The syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) secretion has been reported with certain other sulfonylureas, and it has been suggested that these sulfonylureas may augment the peripheral (antidiuretic) action of ADH and/or increase release of ADH.

Other Reactions

Changes in accommodation and/or blurred vision have been reported with glyburide and other sulfonylureas. These are thought to be related to fluctuation in glucose levels.

In addition to dermatologic reactions, allergic reactions such as angioedema, arthralgia, myalgia and vasculitis have been reported.

Read the DiaBeta (glyburide tablets) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

DRUG INTERACTIONS

The hypoglycemic action of sulfonylureas may be potentiated by certain drugs including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, ACE inhibitors, disopyramide, fluoxetine, clarithromycin, and other drugs that are highly protein bound, salicylates, sulfonamides, chloramphenicol, probenecid, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and beta adrenergic blocking agents. When such drugs are administered to a patient receiving Diaβeta, the patient should be observed closely for hypoglycemia. When such drugs are withdrawn from a patient receiving Diaβeta, the patient should be observed closely for loss of control.

An increased incidence of elevated liver enzymes was observed in patients receiving glyburide concomitantly with bosentan. Therefore concomitant administration of Diaβeta and bosentan is contraindicated (see CONTRAINDICATIONS).

A potential interaction between oral miconazole and oral hypoglycemic agents leading to severe hypoglycemia has been reported. Whether this interaction also occurs with the intravenous, topical or vaginal preparations of miconazole is not known.

A possible interaction between glyburide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics has been reported resulting in a potentiation of the hypoglycemic action of glyburide. The mechanism for this interaction is not known.

Possible interactions between glyburide and coumarin derivatives have been reported that may either potentiate or weaken the effects of coumarin derivatives. The mechanism of these interactions is not known.

Rifampin may worsen glucose control of glyburide because rifampin can significantly induce metabolic isozymes of glyburide such as CYP2C9 and 3A4.

Certain drugs tend to produce hyperglycemia and may lead to loss of control. These drugs include the thiazides and other diuretics, corticosteroids, phenothiazines, thyroid products, estrogens, oral contraceptives, phenytoin, nicotinic acid, sympathomimetics, calcium channel blocking drugs, and isoniazid. When such drugs are administered to a patient receiving Diaβeta, the patient should be closely observed for loss of control. When such drugs are withdrawn from a patient receiving Diaβeta, the patient should be observed closely for hypoglycemia.

Diaβeta may increase cyclosporine plasma concentration and potentially lead to its increased toxicity. Monitoring and dosage adjustment of cyclosporine are therefore recommended when both drugs are coadministered.

Colesevelam: Concomitant administration of colesevelam and glyburide resulted in reductions in glyburide AUC and Cmax of 32% and 47%, respectively. When glyburide was administered 1 hour before colesevelam, the reductions in glyburide AUC and Cmax were 20% and 15%, respectively, and not significantly changed (-7% and 4%, respectively) when administered 4 hours before colesevelam. Therefore, glyburide should be administered at least 4 hours prior to colesevelam.

Glyburide is mainly metabolized by CYP 2C9 and to a lesser extent by CYP 3A4. There is a potential for drug-drug interaction when glyburide is coadministered with inducers or inhibitors of CYP 2C9, which should be taken into account when considering concomitant therapy.

Read the DiaBeta Drug Interactions Center for a complete guide to possible interactions

Last reviewed on RxList: 11/18/2013
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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