July 30, 2015
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Diabetes Treatment

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Diabetes treatment facts

  • Controlling blood sugar (glucose) levels is the major goal of diabetes treatment, in order to prevent complications of the disease.
  • Type 1 diabetes is managed with insulin as well as dietary changes and exercise.
  • Type 2 diabetes may be managed with non-insulin medications, insulin, weight reduction, or dietary changes.
  • The choice of medications for type 2 diabetes is individualized, taking into account:
    • the effectiveness and side effect profile of each medication,
    • the patient's underlying health status,
    • any medication compliance issues, and
    • cost to the patient or health-care system.
  • Medications for type 2 diabetes can work in different ways to reduce blood glucose levels. They may:
    • increase insulin sensitivity,
    • increase glucose excretion,
    • decrease absorption of carbohydrates from the digestive tract, or
    • work through other mechanisms.
  • Medications for type 2 diabetes are often used in combination.
  • Different methods of delivering insulin include:
  • Proper nutrition is a part of any diabetes care plan. There is no one specific "diabetic diet" that is recommended for all individuals.
  • Pancreas transplantation is an area of active study for the treatment of diabetes.

What is the treatment for diabetes?

The major goal in treating type 1 and type 2 diabetes is to control blood sugar (glucose) levels within the normal range, with minimal excursions to low or high levels.

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is treated with:

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is treated:

  • First with weight reduction, a diabetic diet, and exercise
  • Oral medications are prescribed when these measures fail to control the elevated blood sugars of type 2 diabetes.
  • If oral medications become ineffective treatment with insulin is initiated.

Diabetic Diet

Adherence to a diabetic diet is a critical aspect of controlling blood sugar in people with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has provided guidelines for diabetic diets.

Each ADA diet is:

  • balanced,
  • nutritious, and
  • low in fat, cholesterol, and simple sugars.

The total daily calories are evenly divided into three meals (with snacks for youth with type 1 diabetes). Over the past two years the ADA has lifted the absolute ban on simple sugars for people with diabetes. Small amounts of simple sugars are now allowed when consumed with a complex meal.

Weight reduction and exercise

Weight reduction and exercise are important treatments for type 2 diabetes. Weight reduction and exercise increase the body's sensitivity to insulin, thus helping to control blood sugar elevations.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 5/7/2015

Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/diabetes_treatment/article.htm

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