August 24, 2016
Recommended Topic Related To:

Diprolene Lotion

" The risk for immunoglobulin A nephropathy is five times higher in people with severe psoriasis than in those without. And the risk for overall glomerular disease is two times higher.

These findings come from an analysis of data "...

A A A

Diprolene Lotion




Warnings
Precautions

WARNINGS

Included as part of the PRECAUTIONS section.

PRECAUTIONS

Effects on Endocrine System

DIPROLENE Lotion can produce reversible hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression with the potential for glucocorticosteroid insufficiency. This may occur during treatment or after withdrawal of treatment. Factors that predispose to HPA axis suppression include the use of high-potency steroids, large treatment surface areas, prolonged use, use of occlusive dressings, altered skin barrier, liver failure, and young age.

Evaluation for HPA axis suppression may be done by using the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test.

In a trial evaluating the effects of DIPROLENE Lotion on the HPA axis, DIPROLENE Lotion was applied once daily at 7 mL per day for 21 days to diseased scalp and body skin in subjects with scalp psoriasis, DIPROLENE Lotion was shown to lower plasma cortisol levels below normal limits in 2 out of 11 subjects. HPA axis suppression in these subjects was transient and returned to normal within a week. In one of these subjects, plasma cortisol levels returned to normal while treatment continued.

If HPA axis suppression is documented, gradually withdraw the drug, reduce the frequency of application, or substitute with a less potent corticosteroid. Infrequently, signs and symptoms of steroid withdrawal may occur, requiring supplemental systemic corticosteroids.

Cushing's syndrome and hyperglycemia may also occur with topical corticosteroids. These events are rare and generally occur after prolonged exposure to excessively large doses, especially of highpotency topical corticosteroids.

Pediatric patients may be more susceptible to systemic toxicity due to their larger skin surface to body mass ratios [see Use in Specific Populations].

Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Allergic contact dermatitis with corticosteroids is usually diagnosed by observing failure to heal rather than noting a clinical exacerbation. Such an observation should be corroborated with appropriate diagnostic patch testing. If irritation develops, topical corticosteroids should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted.

Nonclinical Toxicology

Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Long-term animal studies have not been performed to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of betamethasone dipropionate. Betamethasone was negative in the bacterial mutagenicity assay (Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli), and in the mammalian cell mutagenicity assay (CHO/HGPRT). It was positive in the in vitro human lymphocyte chromosome aberration assay, and equivocal in the in vivo mouse bone marrow micronucleus assay.

Studies in rabbits, mice, and rats using intramuscular doses up to 1, 33, and 2 mg/kg, respectively, resulted in dose-related increases in fetal resorptions in rabbits and mice.

Use In Specific Populations

Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects: Pregnancy Category C

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. DIPROLENE Lotion should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Betamethasone dipropionate has been shown to be teratogenic in rabbits when given by the intramuscular route at doses of 0.05 mg/kg. The abnormalities observed included umbilical hernias, cephalocele, and cleft palate.

Nursing Mothers

Systemically administered corticosteroids appear in human milk and can suppress growth, interfere with endogenous corticosteroid production, or cause other untoward effects. It is not known whether topical administration of corticosteroids can result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in human milk. Because many drugs are excreted in human milk, caution should be exercised when DIPROLENE Lotion is administered to a nursing woman.

Pediatric Use

Use of DIPROLENE Lotion in pediatric patients younger than 13 years of age is not recommended due to the potential for HPA axis suppression [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

In an open-label HPA axis safety trial in subjects 3 months to 12 years of age with atopic dermatitis, DIPROLENE AF Cream 0.05% was applied twice daily for 2 to 3 weeks over a mean body surface area of 58% (range 35% to 95%). In 19 of 60 (32%) evaluable subjects, adrenal suppression was indicated by either a £5 mcg/dL pre-stimulation cortisol, or a cosyntropin post-stimulation cortisol £18 mcg/dL and/or an increase of <7 mcg/dL from the baseline cortisol. Out of the 19 subjects with HPA axis suppression, 4 subjects were tested 2 weeks after discontinuation of DIPROLENE AF Cream, and 3 of the 4 (75%) had complete recovery of HPA axis function. The proportion of subjects with adrenal suppression in this trial was progressively greater, the younger the age group.

Because of a higher ratio of skin surface area to body mass, pediatric patients are at a greater risk than adults of systemic toxicity when treated with topical drugs. They are, therefore, also at greater risk of HPA axis suppression and adrenal insufficiency upon the use of topical corticosteroids.

Rare systemic effects such as Cushing's syndrome, linear growth retardation, delayed weight gain, and intracranial hypertension have been reported in pediatric patients, especially those with prolonged exposure to large doses of high potency topical corticosteroids.

Local adverse reactions including skin atrophy have also been reported with use of topical corticosteroids in pediatric patients.

Avoid use of DIPROLENE Lotion in the treatment of diaper dermatitis.

Geriatric Use

Clinical trials of DIPROLENE Lotion included 56 subjects who were 65 years of age and over and 9 subjects who were 75 years of age and over. There was a numerical difference for application site reactions (most frequently reported events were burning and stinging) which occurred in 15% (10/65) of geriatric subjects and 11% (38/342) of subjects less than 65 years of age. Other reported clinical experience has not identified differences in responses between the elderly and younger patients. However, greater sensitivity of some older individuals cannot be ruled out.

This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

Last reviewed on RxList: 8/2/2016

Warnings
Precautions

Diprolene Lotion - User Reviews

Diprolene Lotion User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Diprolene Lotion sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Women's Health

Find out what women really need.