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Drowning

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What is drowning and what are the statistics?

According to the World Health Organization, "Drowning is the process of experiencing respiratory impairment from submersion/immersion in liquid." The possible outcomes of drowning are classified as death, morbidity (the development of disability or injury), and no morbidity.

This relatively simple definition was agreed upon at the 2002 World Congress of Drowning held in Amsterdam. Prior to that meeting, some definitions and classifications of drowning were not necessarily well defined, and their meanings were subject to a variety of interpretations by different countries and health organizations. While some people still try to sort drowning events into categories (for example wet vs. dry, primary vs. secondary, fatal vs. non-fatal), these terms may or may not adequately describe a patient's situation, the effects of drowning on their body, or the potential outcome.

Drowning is the third most common cause of accidental death worldwide, accounting for 7% of all injury related deaths. Almost 400,000 people die every year from drowning. This number significantly underestimates the actual number because they do not include those who drown in floods, boating, or water transport accidents. Almost half of all drowning in the world occur in China and India.

The death rate from drowning does not reflect the potential morbidity (disability) due to brain injury for those who survive a drowning episode. Most countries do not keep non-fatal drowning statistics.

What happens during drowning?

Drowning occurs when water comes into contact with the larynx (voice box).

  • After an initial gasp, there is an initial voluntary breath holding.
  • This is followed by spasm of the larynx and the development of hypoxemia (hypo=low + ox=oxygen + emia=blood), or decreased levels of oxygen in the bloodstream.
  • Lack of oxygen causes aerobic metabolism to stop, and the body becomes acidotic. If not corrected quickly, the lack of oxygen in combination with too much acid may lead to problems with the electrical conduction system of the heart (cardiac arrest) and lack of blood supply to the brain.
  • As body function declines, aspiration may occur as the larynx relaxes allowing water to enter the lungs. However, up to 20% of drowning victims have persistent spasm of the larynx, and no water is aspirated (this was formerly known as "dry" drowning).
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 6/19/2013

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Drowning - Treatment Question: If you know someone who drowned or nearly drowned, what type of emergency treatment was used?
Drowning - Prevention Question: Do you and your family know how to swim? Are you trained in CPR? Please share your experience.
Drowning - What Happens Question: If you had a near drowning experience, please describe what happened and how it felt.
Drowning - Risk Factors Question: Do you know someone who drowned or nearly drowned? What were her/his risk factors (age, medical condition, etc.)?
Drowning - Water Safety Question: Do you have a pool? Please share suggestions for water safety amd how you try to prevent drownings.
Source: MedicineNet.com
http://www.medicinenet.com/drowning/article.htm

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