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What other names is Moringa known by?

Arango, Árbol de las Perlas, Behen, Ben Ailé, Ben Nut Tree, Ben Oléifère, Benzolive, Canéficier de l'Inde, Chinto Borrego, Clarifier Tree, Drumstick Tree, Horseradish Tree, Indian Horseradish, Jacinto, Kelor Tree, Malunggay, Marango, Mlonge, Moringa oleifera, Moringa pterygosperma, Moringe de Ceylan, Mulangay, Murungakai, Narango, Nebeday, Paraíso Blanco, Perla de la India, Pois Quénique, Sahjna, Saijan, Saijhan, Sajna, San Jacinto, Shagara al Rauwaq, Shigru, Terebinto.

What is Moringa?

Moringa is a plant that is native to areas of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Afghanistan. It is also grown in the tropics. The leaves, bark, flowers, fruit, seeds, and root are used to make medicine.

Moringa is taken by mouth for "tired blood" (anemia), arthritis and other joint pain (rheumatism), asthma, cancer, constipation, diabetes, diarrhea, seizures, stomach pain, stomach and intestinal ulcers, intestinal spasms, headache, heart problems, high blood pressure, kidney stones, symptoms of menopause, thyroid disorders, and infections.

Moringa is also taken by mouth to reduce swelling, as an antioxidant, to prevent spasms, increase sex drive (as an aphrodisiac), prevent pregnancy, boost the immune system, and increase breast milk production. Some people use it as a nutritional supplement or tonic. It is also used as a "water pill" (diuretic).

Moringa is sometimes applied directly to the skin as a germ-killer or drying agent (astringent). It is also applied to the skin for treating pockets of infection (abscesses), athlete's foot, dandruff, gum disease (gingivitis), snakebites, warts, and wounds.

Oil from moringa seeds is used in foods, perfume, and hair care products, and as a machine lubricant.

Moringa is an important food source in some parts of the world. Because it can be grown cheaply and easily, and the leaves retain lots of vitamins and minerals when dried, moringa is used in India and Africa in feeding programs to fight malnutrition. The immature green pods (drumsticks) are prepared similarly to green beans, while the seeds are removed from more mature pods and cooked like peas or roasted like nuts. The leaves are cooked and used like spinach, and they are also dried and powdered for use as a condiment.

The seed cake remaining after oil extraction is used as a fertilizer and also to purify well water and to remove salt from seawater.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

    TAKEN BY MOUTH:
  • Asthma. Early research shows that taking 3 grams of moringa twice daily for 3 weeks reduces the severity of asthma symptoms and improves lung function in adults with mild to moderate asthma.
  • Diabetes. Early research shows that taking moringa tablets along with a type medicine called sulfonylureas does not improve blood sugar control better than taking sulfonylureas alone in people with diabetes.
  • Increasing breast milk production. Research regarding the effects of moringa for increasing breast milk production is conflicting. Some early research shows that moringa increases milk production, while other early research shows no benefit. An analysis of data from five clinical studies shows that moringa moderately increases milk product after one week of use when started on postpartum day 3. But it's not clear if moringa is beneficial when used for longer periods of time.
  • Malnutrition. Early research shows that adding moringa powder to food for 2 months helps improve weight in malnourished children.
  • Menopausal symptoms. Early research shows that adding fresh moringa leaves to food for 3 months improves menopausal symptoms such as hot flashes and sleeping problems in healthy, postmenopausal women.
  • "Tired blood" (anemia).
  • Arthritis.
  • As a nutritional supplement.
  • Birth control.
  • Cancer.
  • Constipation.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Epilepsy.
  • Headache.
  • Heart problems.
  • High blood pressure.
  • Increasing sex drive.
  • Infections.
  • Kidney stones.
  • Stomach and intestinal ulcers.
  • Stomach pain (gastritis).
  • Swelling (inflammation).
  • Stimulating immunity.
  • Thyroid disorders.
  • Other conditions.
  • APPLIED TO THE SKIN:
  • Athlete's foot..
  • Dandruff.
  • Gum disease (gingivitis).
  • Warts.
  • Skin infections.
  • Snakebites.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate moringa for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).


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