July 26, 2016

Dry Socket

What are risk factors for getting dry socket?

Smoking is a risk factor for developing a dry socket due to the nicotine found in cigarettes. Exposure to nicotine reduces the blood supply available to the healing socket and can prevent the proper formation of a blood clot at the extraction site.

Extraction of impacted third molars (wisdom teeth) can be traumatic as some surrounding gum tissue and jawbone may need to be removed or may be adversely affected during surgery. Although the extraction is necessary, the resulting trauma can increase the chances of dry socket.

Previous infections such as periodontal disease or pericoronitis at the site of the extraction can predispose an individual to dry socket.

Women have been found to develop a dry socket more so than men. This may be related to hormonal factors such as use of oral contraceptives or normal hormonal changes during a woman's cycle.

Patients older than 30 years of age with impacted third molars have an increased risk of dry socket. With age, the jawbone becomes more dense and has less blood supply available. A dense jawbone increases the risk of a traumatic extraction and less blood supply decreases the chances of blood clot formation and timely healing. Continue Reading

3/7
Reviewed on 1/11/2016