Recommended Topic Related To:

Dtic-Dome

"The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Lymphoseek (technetium Tc 99m tilmanocept) Injection, a radioactive diagnostic imaging agent that helps doctors locate lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer or melanoma who are undergoing "...

Dtic-Dome

Dtic-Dome Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving dacarbazine (Dtic-Dome)?

You should not use dacarbazine if you are allergic to it.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether dacarbazine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

It is not known whether dacarbazine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are being treated with dacarbazine.

How is dacarbazine given (Dtic-Dome)?

Dacarbazine is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting.

Avoid eating anything for 4 to 6 hours before your injection. This may help prevent severe nausea or vomiting.

Tell your caregivers if you feel any burning, pain, or swelling around the IV needle when dacarbazine is injected.

Dacarbazine is sometimes given daily for 5 to 10 days in a row every 3 or 4 weeks. For Hodkin's disease, you may only receive dacarbazine for 1 day every 15 days. Your doctor will determine how long to treat you with dacarbazine.

Dacarbazine can lower blood cells that help your body fight infections. This can make it easier for you to bleed from an injury or get sick from being around others who are ill.

To make sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your blood will need to be tested often. Your cancer treatments may be delayed based on the results of these tests. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

Side Effects Centers
A A A

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Cancer

Get the latest treatment options.


NIH talks about Ebola on WebMD