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Dutoprol

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Dutoprol

SIDE EFFECTS

Metoprolol succinate extended release /hydrochlorothiazide

The metoprolol succinate extended release and hydrochlorothiazide combination was evaluated for safety in 891 patients treated for hypertension in clinical trials. In a placebo-controlled trial, 843 patients were treated with various combinations of metoprolol succinate (doses of 25 to 200 mg) and hydrochlorothiazide (doses of 6.25 to 25 mg). Overall, the incidence of adverse experiences reported with the combination was comparable to placebo. Adverse events, whether or not attributed to treatment, occurring in greater than 1% of patients treated with DUTOPROL and at a rate equal to or greater than with placebo were: nasopharyngitis (3.4% vs 1.3%), fatigue (2.6% vs 0.7%), dizziness (2.6% vs 2.6%), back pain (1.7% vs 1.3%), and nausea (1.4% vs 0.7%). Adverse experiences were usually mild and transient in nature and infrequently required discontinuation of therapy (2.7% vs 2.6% with placebo).

Metoprolol

Most adverse effects have been mild and transient. The following adverse reactions have been reported for immediate release metoprolol tartrate.

Central Nervous System: Tiredness and dizziness have occurred in about 10 of 100 patients. Depression has been reported in about 5 of 100 patients. Mental confusion and short-term memory loss have been reported. Headache, somnolence, nightmares, and insomnia have also been reported.

Cardiovascular: Shortness of breath and bradycardia have occurred in approximately 3 of 100 patients. Cold extremities; arterial insufficiency, usually of the Raynaud type; palpitations; congestive heart failure; peripheral edema; syncope; chest pain; and hypotension have been reported in about 1 of 100 patients (see CONTRAINDICATIONS, WARNINGS, and PRECAUTIONS).

Respiratory: Wheezing (bronchospasm) and dyspnea have been reported in about 1 of 100 patients (see WARNINGS).

Gastrointestinal: Diarrhea has occurred in about 5 of 100 patients. Nausea, dry mouth, gastric pain, constipation, flatulence, digestive tract disorders, and heartburn have been reported in about 1 of 100 patients.

Hypersensitive Reactions: Pruritus or rash have occurred in about 5 of 100 patients. Worsening of psoriasis has also been reported.

Miscellaneous: Peyronie's disease has been reported in fewer than 1 of 100,000 patients. Musculoskeletal pain, blurred vision, decreased libido, and tinnitus have also been reported.

There have been rare reports of reversible alopecia, agranulocytosis, and dry eyes. Discontinuation of the drug should be considered if any such reaction is not otherwise explicable. The oculomucocutaneous syndrome associated with the beta-blocker practolol has not been reported with metoprolol.

Potential Adverse Reactions

In addition, there are a variety of adverse reactions not listed above, which have been reported with other beta-adrenergic blocking agents and should be considered potential adverse reactions to DUTOPROL.

Central Nervous System: Reversible mental depression progressing to catatonia; an acute reversible syndrome characterized by disorientation for time and place, short-term memory loss, emotional lability, slightly clouded sensorium, and decreased performance on neuropsychometrics.

Cardiovascular: Intensification of AV block (see CONTRAINDICATIONS).

Hematologic: Agranulocytosis, nonthrombocytopenic purpura, thrombocytopenic purpura.

Hypersensitive Reactions: Fever combined with aching and sore throat, laryngospasm, and respiratory distress.

Post-Marketing Experience

In addition, the following adverse reactions have been reported with metoprolol succinate in worldwide post-marketing use, regardless of causality:

Cardiovascular: 2nd and 3rd degree heart block.

Gastrointestinal: hepatitis, vomiting.

Hematologic: thrombocytopenia.

Musculoskeletal: arthralgia.

Nervous System/Psychiatric: anxiety/nervousness, hallucinations, paresthesia.

Reproductive, male: impotence.

Skin: increased sweating, photosensitivity, urticaria.

Special Sense Organs: taste disturbances.

Hydrochlorothiazide

Other adverse experiences that have been reported with hydrochlorothiazide, without regard to causality, are listed below:

Body As A Whole: weakness; Cardiovascular: hypotension including orthostatic hypotension (may be aggravated by alcohol, barbiturates, narcotics or antihypertensive drugs); Digestive: pancreatitis, jaundice (intrahepatic cholestatic jaundice), diarrhea, vomiting, sialadenitis, cramping, constipation, gastric irritation, nausea, anorexia; Hematologic: aplastic anemia, agranulocytosis, leukopenia, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia; Hypersensitivity: anaphylactic reactions, necrotizing angiitis (vasculitis and cutaneous vasculitis), respiratory distress including pneumonitis and pulmonary edema, photosensitivity, fever, urticaria, rash, purpura; Metabolic: electrolyte imbalance, glycosuria; Musculoskeletal: muscle spasm; Nervous System/Psychiatric: Vertigo, paresthesias, dizziness, headache, restlessness; Renal: renal failure, renal dysfunction, interstitial nephritis; Skin: erythema multiforme including Stevens-Johnson syndrome, exfoliative dermatitis including toxic epidermal necrolysis, alopecia; Special Senses: transient blurred vision, xanthopsia; Urogenital: impotence.

Laboratory Test Findings

In controlled clinical trials, clinically important changes in standard laboratory parameters were infrequently associated with the administration of DUTOPROL. The laboratory test findings with metoprolol or hydrochlorothiazide or their combination may include:

Creatinine, Blood Urea NitrogenMinor increases in blood urea nitrogen (BUN) . (See WARNINGS, Renal Disease.)

Serum ElectrolytesDeclines in serum potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium. Increases in serum calcium and uric acid. (See PRECAUTIONS).

GlucoseIncrease in serum or blood glucose. (See PRECAUTIONS, General, Hydrochlorothiazide.)

LipidsIncrease in serum total cholesterol, triglycerides. Decreases in high density lipoprotein (HDL).

Liver Function TestsIncreases in liver enzymes and/or serum bilirubin.

Read the Dutoprol (metroprolol) Side Effects Center for a complete guide to possible side effects

DRUG INTERACTIONS

Metoprolol

Catecholamine-depleting drugs (eg, reserpine, monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors) may have an additive effect when given with beta-blocking agents. Observe patients treated with DUTOPROL plus a catecholamine depletor for evidence of hypotension or marked bradycardia, which may produce vertigo, syncope, or postural hypotension.

Drugs that inhibit CYP2D6 such as quinidine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, and propafenone are likely to increase metoprolol concentration. In healthy subjects with CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer phenotype, coadministration of quinidine 100 mg and immediate-release metoprolol 200 mg tripled the concentration of S-metoprolol and doubled the metoprolol elimination half-life. In four patients with cardiovascular disease, coadministration of propafenone 150 mg t.i.d. with immediate-release metoprolol 50 mg t.i.d. resulted in two- to five-fold increases in the steady-state concentration of metoprolol. These increases in plasma concentration would decrease the cardioselectivity of metoprolol.

Digitalis glycosides, clonidine, diltiazem and verapamil slow atrioventricular conduction and decrease heart rate. Concomitant use with beta blockers can increase the risk of bradycardia.

If clonidine and a beta blocker, such as metoprolol are coadministered, withdraw the beta-blocker several days before the gradual withdrawal of clonidine because beta-blockers may exacerbate the rebound hypertension that can follow the withdrawal of clonidine. If replacing clonidine by beta-blocker therapy, delay the introduction of beta-blockers for several days after clonidine administration has stopped (see WARNINGS).

Hydrochlorothiazide

When administered concurrently the following drugs may interact with thiazide diuretics:

Alcohol, barbiturates, or narcotics – Potentiation of orthostatic hypotension may occur.

Antidiabetic drugs (oral agents and insulin) – Dosage adjustment of the antidiabetic drug may be required.

Other antihypertensive drugs – Additive effect or potentiation.

Cholestyramine and colestipol resins – Absorption of hydrochlorothiazide is impaired in the presence of anionic exchange resins. Single doses of either cholestyramine or colestipol resins bind the hydrochlorothiazide and reduce its absorption from the gastrointestinal tract by up to 85 and 43 percent, respectively.

Corticosteroids, ACTH – Intensified electrolyte depletion, particularly hypokalemia.

Pressor amines (eg, norepinephrine) – Possible decreased response to pressor amines but not sufficient to preclude their use.

Skeletal muscle relaxants, nondepolarizing (eg, tubocurarine) – Possible increased responsiveness to the muscle relaxant.

Lithium – Generally should not be given with diuretics. Diuretic agents reduce the renal clearance of lithium and add a high risk of lithium toxicity. Refer to the package insert for lithium preparations before use of such preparations with DUTOPROL.

Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs – In some patients, the administration of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent can reduce the diuretic, natriuretic, and antihypertensive effects of loop, potassium sparing and thiazide diuretics. Therefore, when DUTOPROL and non-steroidal antiinflammatory agents are used concomitantly, the patient should be observed closely to determine if the desired effect of the diuretic is obtained.

Read the Dutoprol Drug Interactions Center for a complete guide to possible interactions

Last reviewed on RxList: 1/9/2012
This monograph has been modified to include the generic and brand name in many instances.

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You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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