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Elaprase

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Elaprase

Elaprase Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Elaprase (idursulfase) Solution for Intravenous Infusion is an enzyme used to treat some of the symptoms of a genetic condition called Hunter syndrome (also called mucopolysaccharidosis). It may improve walking ability in people with this condition. This medication is not a cure for Hunter syndrome. Common side effects include joint pain, pain in your arms or legs, headache, itching, mild skin rash, or weakness.

The recommended dosage regimen of Elaprase is 0.5 mg per kg of body weight administered once weekly as an intravenous infusion. Elaprase may interact with other drugs. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy, Elaprase should be used only if prescribed. It may be harmful to a fetus. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Elaprase (idursulfase) Solution for Intravenous Infusion Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Patient Information in Detail?

Easy-to-read and understand detailed drug information and pill images for the patient or caregiver from Cerner Multum.

Elaprase in Detail - Patient Information: Side Effects

Some people receiving a idursulfase injection have had a reaction to the infusion (when the medicine is injected into the vein). Tell your caregiver right away if you feel dizzy, light-headed, or have hives, seizure (convulsions), trouble breathing, or swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

It may still be possible for you to receive idursulfase even after you have had a reaction to it. There are other medications that can be given to you before your idursulfase infusion to help prevent any reaction symptoms.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:

  • worsened asthma;
  • uneven heartbeats;
  • blue lips or fingernails;
  • fever;
  • vision problems; or
  • increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure).

Less serious side effects may include:

  • joint pain;
  • pain in your arms or legs;
  • headache;
  • itching, mild skin rash; or
  • weakness.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Tell your doctor about any unusual or bothersome side effect. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Elaprase (Idursulfase Solution) »

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Elaprase FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

Clinical Trials Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

The following serious adverse reactions are described below and elsewhere in the labeling:

In clinical trials, the most common adverse reactions ( > 10%) following ELAPRASE treatment were hypersensitivity reactions, and included rash, urticaria, pruritus, flushing, pyrexia, and headache. Most hypersensitivity reactions requiring intervention were ameliorated with slowing of the infusion rate, temporarily stopping the infusion, with or without administering additional treatments including antihistamines, corticosteroids or both prior to or during infusions.

In clinical trials, the most frequent serious adverse reactions following ELAPRASE treatment were hypoxic episodes. Other notable serious adverse reactions that occurred in the ELAPRASE-treated patients but not in the placebo-treated patients included one case each of: cardiac arrhythmia, pulmonary embolism, cyanosis, respiratory failure, infection, and arthralgia.

Clinical Trials in Patients 5 Years and Older

A 53-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of ELAPRASE was conducted in 96 male patients with Hunter syndrome, ages 5-31 years old. Of the 96 patients, 83% were White, non-Hispanic. Patients were randomized to three treatment groups, each with 32 patients: ELAPRASE 0.5 mg/kg once weekly, ELAPRASE 0.5 mg/kg every other week, or placebo. Hypersensitivity reactions were reported in 69% (22 of 32) of patients who received once-weekly treatment of ELAPRASE.

Table 1 summarizes the adverse reactions that occurred in at least 9% of patients ( ≥ 3 patients) in the ELAPRASE 0.5 mg/kg once weekly group and with a higher incidence than in the placebo group.

Table 1: Adverse Reactions that Occurred in the Placebo-Controlled Trial in At Least 9% of Patients in the ELAPRASE 0.5 mg/kg Once Weekly Group and with a Higher Incidence than in the Placebo Group (5 Years and Older)

System Organ Class
Adverse Reaction
ELAPRASE (0.5 mg/kg weekly)
N=32
n (%)
Placebo
N=32
n (%)
Gastrointestinal disorder
  Diarrhea 3 (9%) 1 (3%)
Musculoskeletal and Connective Tissue Disorders
  Musculoskeletal Pain 4 (13%) 1 (3%)
Nervous system disorders
  Headache 9 (28%) 8 (25%)
Respiratory, thoracic and mediastinal disorders
  Cough 3 (9%) 1 (3%)
Skin and subcutaneous tissue disorders
  Pruritus 8 (25%) 3 (9%)
  Urticaria 5 (16%) 0 (0%)

Additional adverse reactions that occurred in at least 9% of patients ( ≥ 3 patients) in the ELAPRASE 0.5 mg/kg every other week group and with a higher incidence than in the placebo group included: rash (19%), flushing (16%), fatigue (13%), tachycardia (9%), and chills (9%).

Extension Trial

An open-label extension trial was conducted in patients who completed the placebo-controlled trial. Ninety-four of the 96 patients who were enrolled in the placebo-controlled trial consented to participate in the extension trial. All 94 patients received ELAPRASE 0.5 mg/kg once weekly for 24 months. No new serious adverse reactions were reported. Approximately half (53%) of patients experienced hypersensitivity reactions during the 24-month extension trial. In addition to the adverse reactions listed in Table 1, common hypersensitivity reactions occurring in at least 5% of patients ( ≥ 5 patients) in the extension trial included: rash (23%), pyrexia (9%), flushing (7%), erythema (7%), nausea (5%), dizziness (5%), vomiting (5%), and hypotension (5%).

Clinical Trial in Patients 7 Years and Younger

A 53-week, open-label, single-arm, safety trial of once weekly ELAPRASE 0.5 mg/kg treatment was conducted in patients with Hunter syndrome, ages 16 months to 4 years old (n=20) and ages 5 to 7.5 years old (n=8) at enrollment. Patients experienced similar adverse reactions as those observed in clinical trials in patients 5 years and older, with the most common adverse reactions following ELAPRASE treatment being hypersensitivity reactions (57%). A higher incidence of the following common hypersensitivity reactions were reported in this younger age group: pyrexia (36%), rash (32%) and vomiting (14%). The most common serious adverse reactions occurring in at least 10% of patients ( ≥ 3 patients) included: bronchopneumonia/pneumonia (18%), ear infection (11%), and pyrexia (11%).

Twenty-seven patients had results of genotype analysis: 15 patients had complete gene deletion, large gene rearrangement, nonsense, frameshift or splice site mutations and 12 patients had missense mutations.

Safety results demonstrated that patients with complete gene deletion, large gene rearrangement, nonsense, frameshift, or splice site mutations are more likely to experience hypersensitivity reactions and have serious adverse reactions following ELAPRASE administration, compared to patients with missense mutations. Table 2 summarizes these findings.

Table 2: Impact of Antibody Status and Genetic Mutations on Occurrence of Serious Adverse Reactions and Hypersensitivity in Patients 7 Years and Younger Treated with ELAPRASE

  Total Anti-idursulfase antibodies (Ab) Anti-idursulfase neutralizing antibodies (Nab)
Positive Negative Positive Negative
Antibody Status Reported (patients) 28 19 9 15 13
Serious Adverse Reactions* (patients) 13 11 2 9 4
Hypersensitivity (patients) 16 12 4 10 6
Patients with genotype data 27
MUTATIONS Missense Mutation (n=12) Antibody status 12 3 9 1 11
Serious Adverse Reactions 2 0 2 0 2
Hypersensitivity Reactions 5 1 4 0 5
Complete Gene Deletion, Large Gene Rearrangement, Nonsense, Frameshift, Splice Site Mutations (n=15) Antibody Status 15 15 0 13 2
Serious Adverse Reactions 9 9 0 7 2
Hypersensitivity Reactions 11 11 0 10 1
* Serious adverse reactions included: bronchopneumonia/pneumonia, ear infection, and pyrexia.

Immunogenicity

Clinical Trials in Patients 5 Years and Older

As with all therapeutic proteins, there is potential for immunogenicity. In clinical trials in patients 5 years and older, 63 of the 64 patients treated with ELAPRASE 0.5 mg/kg once weekly or placebo for 53 weeks, followed by ELAPRASE 0.5 mg/kg once weekly in the extension trial, had immunogenicity data available for analysis. Of the 63 patients, 32 (51%) patients tested positive for anti-idursulfase IgG antibodies (Ab) at least one time (Table 2). Of the 32 Ab-positive patients, 23 (72%) tested positive for Ab at three or more different time points (persistent Ab). The incidence of hypersensitivity reactions was higher in patients who tested positive for Ab than those who tested negative.

Thirteen of 32 (41%) Ab-positive patients also tested positive for antibodies that neutralize idursulfase uptake into cells (uptake neutralizing antibodies, uptake NAb) or enzymatic activity (activity NAb) at least one time, and 8 (25%) of Ab-positive patients had persistent NAb. There was no clear relationship between the presence of either Ab or NAb and therapeutic response.

Clinical Trial in Patients 7 Years and Younger

In the clinical trial in patients 7 years and younger, 19 of 28 (68%) patients treated with ELAPRASE 0.5 mg/kg once weekly tested Ab-positive. Of the 19 Ab-positive patients, 16 (84%) tested positive for Ab at three or more different time points (persistent Ab). In addition, 15 of 19 (79%) Ab-positive patients tested positive for NAb, with 14 of 15 (93%) NAb-positive patients having persistent NAb.

All 15 patients with complete gene deletion, large gene rearrangement, nonsense, frameshift or splice site mutations tested positive for Ab (Table 2). Of these 15 patients, neutralizing antibodies were observed in 13 (87%) patients. The NAbs in these patients developed earlier (most reported to be positive at Week 9 rather than at Week 27, as reported in clinical trials in patients older than 5 years of age) and were associated with higher titers and greater in vitro neutralizing activity than in patients older than 5 years of age. The presence of Ab was associated with reduced systemic idursulfase exposure [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY].

The immunogenicity data reflect the percentage of patients whose test results were positive for antibodies to idursulfase in specific assays, and are highly dependent on the sensitivity and specificity of these assays. The observed incidence of positive antibody in an assay may be influenced by several factors, including sample handling, timing of sample collection, concomitant medication, and underlying disease. For these reasons, comparison of the incidence of antibodies to idursulfase with the incidence of antibodies to other products may be misleading.

Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post approval use of ELAPRASE. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

In post-marketing experience, late-emergent symptoms and signs of anaphylactic reactions have occurred up to 24 hours after initial treatment and recovery from an initial anaphylactic reaction. In addition, patients experienced repeated anaphylaxis over a two-to four-month period, up to several years after initiating ELAPRASE treatment [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS].

A seven year-old male patient with Hunter syndrome, who received ELAPRASE at twice the recommended dosage (1 mg/kg weekly) for 1.5 years, experienced two anaphylactic events after 4.5 years of treatment. Treatment has been withdrawn [see OVERDOSAGE].

Serious adverse reactions that resulted in death included cardiorespiratory arrest, respiratory failure, respiratory distress, cardiac failure, and pneumonia.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Elaprase (Idursulfase Solution) »

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