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Endometrin

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Endometrin

Endometrin Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using progesterone vaginal?

Some forms of this medication may contain plant-based oils. Do not use progesterone vaginal without telling your doctor if you have any type of food allergy.

You should not use progesterone vaginal if you have ever had an allergic reaction to it, or if you have:

  • a history of stroke, blood clot, or circulation problems;
  • breast or uterine cancer;
  • abnormal vaginal bleeding;
  • liver disease; or
  • if you have recently had a tubal pregnancy or an incomplete or "missed" abortion.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor if you have any of the following conditions. You may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use progesterone:

  • high blood pressure, heart disease, congestive heart failure;
  • migraines,
  • asthma;
  • kidney disease;
  • seizures or epilepsy;
  • diabetes; or
  • a history of depression.

Do not use progesterone vaginal without your doctor's consent if you are pregnant, unless you are using the medication as part of your fertility treatment. Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. If you are not being treated for infertility, use an effective form of birth control while you are using this medication.

Progesterone vaginal can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use progesterone vaginal?

Use this medication exactly as it was prescribed for you. Do not use larger amounts, or use it for longer than recommended by your doctor. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Progesterone vaginal is sometimes given for only 6 to 12 days at a time. When used as part of fertility treatment, progesterone vaginal may be given for up to 12 weeks into a pregnancy. Following your dosing schedule is very important for this medication to be effective. Try not to miss any doses.

This medication comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Do not use other vaginal medications within 6 hours before or after using progesterone vaginal. Use only vaginal products that your doctor has recommended.

Progesterone vaginal gel should be applied directly into the vagina using only the applicator provided with the medicine. A disposable applicator should be used only once and then thrown away.

Progesterone vaginal suppositories are made at the pharmacy and provided to you in a dispensing cup fitted with a mold and a special tool to push each suppository out through the bottom of the mold. Your pharmacist can show you how to dispense the suppositories from the mold.

Before inserting the vaginal suppository, remove the wrapping and throw it away. Avoid handling the suppository too long or it will begin to melt in your hand.

It is normal to have vaginal discharge for several days after using this medication. Talk with your doctor if you have concerns about any vaginal discharge.

Store progesterone vaginal at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Some brands of progesterone vaginal suppositories should be stored in a refrigerator. Follow the instructions provided with your medication.

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Endometrin - User Reviews

Endometrin User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Endometrin sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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