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Entex Pse

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Entex Pse

Entex Pse Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

Entex PSE (pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin) is a combination decongestant and expectorant used to treat stuffy nose, sinus congestion, and cough caused by allergies or the common cold. This medication is available in generic form. Common side effects include dizziness, headache, restlessness, excited feeling, insomnia, nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, loss of appetite, warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin, skin rash, or itching.

The recommended dose of Entex PSE for adults and adolescents 12 years of age and older is one tablet twice daily (every 12 hours). The dose for children 6 to under 12 years is one-half (1/2) tablet twice daily (every 12 hours). Entex PSE may interact with methyldopa, blood pressure medications, beta-blockers, or antidepressants. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy, It is unknown if Entex PSE will harm a fetus. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication. This drug may pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Entex PSE (pseudoephedrine and guaifenesin) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Patient Information in Detail?

Easy-to-read and understand detailed drug information and pill images for the patient or caregiver from Cerner Multum.

Entex Pse in Detail - Patient Information: Side Effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using guaifenesin and pseudoephedrine and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • fast, pounding, or uneven heartbeat;
  • severe dizziness, anxiety, or nervousness;
  • easy bruising or bleeding, unusual weakness, fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms; or
  • increased blood pressure (severe headache, blurred vision, trouble concentrating, chest pain, numbness, seizure).

Other common side effects may include:

  • mild dizziness or headache;
  • feeling restless or excited;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • mild nausea, vomiting, or stomach upset;
  • mild loss of appetite;
  • warmth, redness, or tingly feeling under your skin; or
  • skin rash or itching.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Read the entire detailed patient monograph for Entex Pse (Pseudoephedrine and Guaifenesin) »

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

Entex Pse FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

Gastrointestinal:   nausea and vomiting.

Central Nervous System:   nervousness, dizziness, sleeplessness, lightheadedness, tremor, hallucinations, convulsions, CNS depression, fear, anxiety, headache, increased irritability or excitement.

Cardiovascular:   palpitations, tachycardia, cardiovascular collapse and death.

General:   weakness.

Respiratory:   respiratory difficulties.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Entex Pse (Pseudoephedrine and Guaifenesin) »

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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