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Flector Patch

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Flector Patch

Flector Patch Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using diclofenac transdermal (Flector Patch)?

While the risk of absorbing diclofenac transdermal into your bloodstream is low, an NSAID can cause life-threatening heart or circulation problems such as heart attack or stroke, especially if you use it long term.

This medicine may also cause serious effects on the stomach or intestines, including bleeding or perforation (forming of a hole). These conditions can be fatal and can occur without warning while you are using diclofenac transdermal, especially in older adults.

Do not use this medication if you have ever had asthma or a severe allergic reaction caused by aspirin, diclofenac (Cataflam, Voltaren), or another NSAID. Do not use diclofenac just before or after having heart bypass surgery (also called coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use this medicine:

  • a history of drug allergies;
  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot;
  • heart disease, congestive heart failure, high blood pressure;
  • a history of stomach ulcer or bleeding;
  • liver or kidney disease;
  • a bleeding or blood clotting disorder;
  • asthma;
  • polyps in your nose; or
  • if you smoke.

FDA pregnancy category C. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Using diclofenac during the last 3 months of pregnancy may harm the unborn baby. Do not use this medication during pregnancy unless your doctor has told you to.

It is not known whether diclofenac transdermal passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use diclofenac transdermal (Flector Patch)?

Use exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Using extra skin patches will not make the medication more effective. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Apply the skin patch directly to the area of pain. The skin patch can be worn for up to 12 hours and then removed. Apply a new patch at that time if pain continues. Do not wear a skin patch while taking a bath or shower or while swimming.

Do not apply diclofenac transdermal on an open skin wound, or on areas of eczema, infection, skin rash, or burn injury.

Wash your hands after applying or removing a skin patch.

If the patch falls off, try sticking it back on, or use medical tape to hold it on.

After removing a skin patch fold it in half, sticky side in, and throw it away in a place where children or pets cannot get to it. Keep both used and unused skin patches out of the reach of children or pets.

If you use this medication long-term, your blood may need to be tested often. Your blood pressure may also need to be checked. Visit your doctor regularly.

The diclofenac transdermal patch may burn your skin if you wear the patch during an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Remove the patch before undergoing such a test.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not take a skin patch out of the patch envelope until you are ready to use it. Reseal the envelope for storage.

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Flector Patch - User Reviews

Flector Patch User Reviews

Now you can gain knowledge and insight about a drug treatment with Patient Discussions.

Here is a collection of user reviews for the medication Flector Patch sorted by most helpful. Patient Discussions FAQs

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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