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FML

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FML

FML

FML Side Effects Center

Medical Editor: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP

FML (fluorometholone) Ophthalmic Suspension is a topical anti-inflammatory agent for ophthalmic (eye) use, for the treatment of corticosteroid-responsive inflammation of the palpebral and bulbar conjunctiva, cornea and anterior segment of the globe. Common side effects include elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) with possible development of glaucoma and infrequent optic nerve damage, posterior subcapsular cataract formation, and delayed wound healing.

Instill one drop of FML into the conjunctival (eye) sac two to four times daily. During the initial 24 to 48 hours, the dosing frequency may be increased to one application every four hours. FML may interact with other drugs. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. During pregnancy, FML should be used only if prescribed. It is unknown if topical ophthalmic administration of corticosteroids could produce detectable quantities in human milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our FML (fluorometholone) Ophthalmic Suspension Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is Prescribing information?

The FDA package insert formatted in easy-to-find categories for health professionals and clinicians.

FML FDA Prescribing Information: Side Effects
(Adverse Reactions)

SIDE EFFECTS

Adverse reactions include, in decreasing order of frequency, elevation of intraocular pressure (IOP) with possible development of glaucoma and infrequent optic nerve damage, posterior subcapsular cataract formation, and delayed wound healing.

Although systemic effects are extremely uncommon, there have been rare occurrences of systemic hypercorticoidism after use of topical dermatologic steroids applied to the skin.

Corticosteroid-containing preparations have also been reported to cause acute anterior uveitis and perforation of the globe. Keratitis, conjunctivitis, corneal ulcers, mydriasis, conjunctival hyperemia, loss of accommodation and ptosis have occasionally been reported following local use of corticosteroids.

The development of secondary ocular infection (bacterial, fungal and viral) has occurred. Fungal and viral infections of the cornea are particularly prone to develop coincidentally with long-term applications of steroids. The possibility of fungal invasion should be considered in any persistent corneal ulceration where steroid treatment has been used (see WARNINGS).

Transient burning and stinging upon instillation and other minor symptoms of ocular irritation have been reported with the use of FML® suspension. Other adverse events reported with the use of fluorometholone include: allergic reactions; foreign body sensation; erythema of eyelid; eyelid edema/eye swelling; eye discharge; eye pain; eye pruritus; lacrimation increased; rash; taste perversion; visual disturbance (blurry vision); and visual field defect.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for FML (Fluorometholone Ophthalmic Suspension, USP 0.1% Sterile) »

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

 

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


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