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Folotyn

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Folotyn

Folotyn Patient Information including How Should I Take

What should I discuss with my health care provider before receiving pralatrexate (Folotyn)?

You should not receive this medication if you are allergic to it.

To make sure you can safely use pralatrexate, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease.

FDA pregnancy category D. Do not use pralatrexate if you are pregnant. It could harm the unborn baby. Use effective birth control, and tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether pralatrexate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed a baby while you are being treated with pralatrexate.

How is pralatrexate given (Folotyn)?

Pralatrexate is injected into a vein through an IV. You will receive this injection in a clinic or hospital setting.

Pralatrexate is usually given once per week for up to 6 weeks at a time. Follow your doctor's instructions.

You may be required to take daily folic acid supplements starting 10 days before your first dose of pralatrexate and ending 30 days after your last dose. Your doctor may also give you injections of vitamin B12 every 8 to 10 weeks while you are being treated with pralatrexate.

Using vitamin B12 and folic acid can help protect your blood cells from some of the side effects of pralatrexate. Follow your doctor's medication instructions very closely.

To make sure this medication is not causing harmful effects, your blood will need to be tested often. Your cancer treatments may be delayed based on the results of these tests. Do not miss any follow-up visits to your doctor.

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